What to expect when the unexpected happens: Social media communications across crises

Alexandra Olteanu, Sarah Vieweg, Carlos Castillo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of social media to communicate timely information during crisis situations has become a common practice in recent years. In particular, the one-To-many nature of Twitter has created an opportunity for stakeholders to disseminate crisis-relevant messages, and to access vast amounts of information they may not otherwise have. Our goal is to understand what affected populations, response agencies and other stakeholders can expect-And not expect-from these data in various types of disaster situations. Anecdotal evidence suggests that different types of crises elicit different reactions from Twitter users, but we have yet to see whether this is in fact the case. In this paper, we investigate several crises-including natural hazards and human-induced disasters-in a systematic manner and with a consistent methodology. This leads to insights about the prevalence of different information types and sources across a variety of crisis situations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages994-1009
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9781450329224
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2015
Event18th ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2015 - BC, Canada
Duration: 14 Mar 201518 Mar 2015

Other

Other18th ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2015
CountryCanada
CityBC
Period14/3/1518/3/15

Fingerprint

Disasters
Communication
Hazards

Keywords

  • Emergency Management
  • Social Media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Olteanu, A., Vieweg, S., & Castillo, C. (2015). What to expect when the unexpected happens: Social media communications across crises. In CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (pp. 994-1009). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675242

What to expect when the unexpected happens : Social media communications across crises. / Olteanu, Alexandra; Vieweg, Sarah; Castillo, Carlos.

CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. p. 994-1009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Olteanu, A, Vieweg, S & Castillo, C 2015, What to expect when the unexpected happens: Social media communications across crises. in CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 994-1009, 18th ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2015, BC, Canada, 14/3/15. https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675242
Olteanu A, Vieweg S, Castillo C. What to expect when the unexpected happens: Social media communications across crises. In CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2015. p. 994-1009 https://doi.org/10.1145/2675133.2675242
Olteanu, Alexandra ; Vieweg, Sarah ; Castillo, Carlos. / What to expect when the unexpected happens : Social media communications across crises. CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. pp. 994-1009
@inproceedings{2ae3e684e1cb4a2bb613ea69e978b76d,
title = "What to expect when the unexpected happens: Social media communications across crises",
abstract = "The use of social media to communicate timely information during crisis situations has become a common practice in recent years. In particular, the one-To-many nature of Twitter has created an opportunity for stakeholders to disseminate crisis-relevant messages, and to access vast amounts of information they may not otherwise have. Our goal is to understand what affected populations, response agencies and other stakeholders can expect-And not expect-from these data in various types of disaster situations. Anecdotal evidence suggests that different types of crises elicit different reactions from Twitter users, but we have yet to see whether this is in fact the case. In this paper, we investigate several crises-including natural hazards and human-induced disasters-in a systematic manner and with a consistent methodology. This leads to insights about the prevalence of different information types and sources across a variety of crisis situations.",
keywords = "Emergency Management, Social Media",
author = "Alexandra Olteanu and Sarah Vieweg and Carlos Castillo",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1145/2675133.2675242",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781450329224",
pages = "994--1009",
booktitle = "CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery, Inc",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - What to expect when the unexpected happens

T2 - Social media communications across crises

AU - Olteanu, Alexandra

AU - Vieweg, Sarah

AU - Castillo, Carlos

PY - 2015/2/28

Y1 - 2015/2/28

N2 - The use of social media to communicate timely information during crisis situations has become a common practice in recent years. In particular, the one-To-many nature of Twitter has created an opportunity for stakeholders to disseminate crisis-relevant messages, and to access vast amounts of information they may not otherwise have. Our goal is to understand what affected populations, response agencies and other stakeholders can expect-And not expect-from these data in various types of disaster situations. Anecdotal evidence suggests that different types of crises elicit different reactions from Twitter users, but we have yet to see whether this is in fact the case. In this paper, we investigate several crises-including natural hazards and human-induced disasters-in a systematic manner and with a consistent methodology. This leads to insights about the prevalence of different information types and sources across a variety of crisis situations.

AB - The use of social media to communicate timely information during crisis situations has become a common practice in recent years. In particular, the one-To-many nature of Twitter has created an opportunity for stakeholders to disseminate crisis-relevant messages, and to access vast amounts of information they may not otherwise have. Our goal is to understand what affected populations, response agencies and other stakeholders can expect-And not expect-from these data in various types of disaster situations. Anecdotal evidence suggests that different types of crises elicit different reactions from Twitter users, but we have yet to see whether this is in fact the case. In this paper, we investigate several crises-including natural hazards and human-induced disasters-in a systematic manner and with a consistent methodology. This leads to insights about the prevalence of different information types and sources across a variety of crisis situations.

KW - Emergency Management

KW - Social Media

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84968732826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84968732826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/2675133.2675242

DO - 10.1145/2675133.2675242

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84968732826

SN - 9781450329224

SP - 994

EP - 1009

BT - CSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing

PB - Association for Computing Machinery, Inc

ER -