Web log analysis panel

Bernard Jansen, Suresh Bhavnani, Craig Murray, Amanda Spink, Dietmar Wolfram

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A significant number of Web systems, search engines, and Websites collect large amount of user data in transaction and search logs. The availability of such logs has produced a wealth of research and development over the past decade on search patterns for Web search engines, intranet search services, target advertising, and Website design. These Web logs can certainly be rich sources of both personal data and user behavior. The availability of such data has resulted in significant advances in personalization, targeted search, and information push. However, these logs provide challenges and risks, along with opportunities. Panel members will discuss which critical research challenges need to be addressed in the near future. The panel members will also engage in a dialogue with audience members to develop an agenda for advancing the state of Web transaction and search log research on collecting Web log data, sharing data, addressing user privacy, analysis tools, and techniques to aid in Web log analysis. The panel and discussion will addresses aspects of log analysis focusing the users, metrics, technology, user - system interaction, policy, and balancing research objectives with privacy. Issues to be covered include (but are not limited to): 1. Security: Can we design and implement standards for collecting log data and sharing logs? 2. Social: What are the ethical issues of log analysis? What are the legal issues of log collection and use? Is there a social responsible for collecting and preserving log data, in addition to protecting privacy? 3. Standards: Different researchers and practitioners define search process events differently. How can we implement standards in the log analysis area? 4. Techniques: What are effective and efficient methods and tools for log collection and analysis? 5. Technology: Much log analysis results have focused on descriptive measures. How can findings best be translated into practice, whether for system design or service development?

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting
Volume44
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd Electronic edition of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology - Milwaukee, WI
Duration: 19 Oct 200724 Oct 2007

Other

Other3rd Electronic edition of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
CityMilwaukee, WI
Period19/10/0724/10/07

Fingerprint

Search engines
World Wide Web
privacy
Availability
Data privacy
Intranets
search engine
transaction
website
Websites
Marketing
Systems analysis
Intranet
personal data
personalization
research and development
dialogue
event
interaction
Web Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Jansen, B., Bhavnani, S., Murray, C., Spink, A., & Wolfram, D. (2007). Web log analysis panel. In Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting (Vol. 44)

Web log analysis panel. / Jansen, Bernard; Bhavnani, Suresh; Murray, Craig; Spink, Amanda; Wolfram, Dietmar.

Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting. Vol. 44 2007.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jansen, B, Bhavnani, S, Murray, C, Spink, A & Wolfram, D 2007, Web log analysis panel. in Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting. vol. 44, 3rd Electronic edition of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Milwaukee, WI, 19/10/07.
Jansen B, Bhavnani S, Murray C, Spink A, Wolfram D. Web log analysis panel. In Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting. Vol. 44. 2007
Jansen, Bernard ; Bhavnani, Suresh ; Murray, Craig ; Spink, Amanda ; Wolfram, Dietmar. / Web log analysis panel. Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting. Vol. 44 2007.
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