Variants in the CD36 gene associate with the metabolic syndrome and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

Latisha Love-Gregory, Richard Sherva, Lingwei Sun, Jon Wasson, Timothy Schappe, Alessandro Doria, D. C. Rao, Steven Hunt, Samuel Klein, Rosalind J. Neuman, M. Alan Permutt, Nada A. Abumrad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A region along chromosome 7q was recently linked to components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in several genome-wide linkage studies. Within this region, the CD36 gene, which encodes a membrane receptor for long-chain fatty acids and lipoproteins, is a potentially important candidate. CD36 has been documented to play an important role in fatty acid metabolism in vivo and subsequently may be involved in the etiology of the MetS. The protein also impacts survival to malaria and the influence of natural selection has resulted in high CD36 genetic variability in populations of African descent. We evaluated 36 tag SNPs across CD36 in the HyperGen population sample of 2020 African-Americans for impact on the MetS and its quantitative traits. Five SNPs associated with increased odds for the MetS [P = 0.0027-0.03, odds ratio (OR) = 1.3-1.4]. Coding SNP, rs3211938, previously shown to influence malaria susceptibility, is documented to result in CD36 deficiency in a homozygous subject. This SNP conferred protection against the MetS (P = 0.0012, OR = 0.61, 95%CI: 0.46-0.82), increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL-C (P = 0.00018) and decreased triglycerides (P = 0.0059). Fifteen additional SNPs associated with HDL-C (P = 0.0028-0.044). We conclude that CD36 variants may impact MetS pathophysiology and HDL metabolism, both predictors of the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1695-1704
Number of pages10
JournalHuman Molecular Genetics
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

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HDL Cholesterol
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genes
Malaria
Fatty Acids
Odds Ratio
Genetic Selection
African Americans
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Population
Lipoproteins
Heart Diseases
Triglycerides
Chromosomes
Genome
Membranes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Love-Gregory, L., Sherva, R., Sun, L., Wasson, J., Schappe, T., Doria, A., ... Abumrad, N. A. (2008). Variants in the CD36 gene associate with the metabolic syndrome and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Human Molecular Genetics, 17(11), 1695-1704. https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddn060

Variants in the CD36 gene associate with the metabolic syndrome and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. / Love-Gregory, Latisha; Sherva, Richard; Sun, Lingwei; Wasson, Jon; Schappe, Timothy; Doria, Alessandro; Rao, D. C.; Hunt, Steven; Klein, Samuel; Neuman, Rosalind J.; Permutt, M. Alan; Abumrad, Nada A.

In: Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 17, No. 11, 06.2008, p. 1695-1704.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Love-Gregory, L, Sherva, R, Sun, L, Wasson, J, Schappe, T, Doria, A, Rao, DC, Hunt, S, Klein, S, Neuman, RJ, Permutt, MA & Abumrad, NA 2008, 'Variants in the CD36 gene associate with the metabolic syndrome and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol', Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 17, no. 11, pp. 1695-1704. https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddn060
Love-Gregory, Latisha ; Sherva, Richard ; Sun, Lingwei ; Wasson, Jon ; Schappe, Timothy ; Doria, Alessandro ; Rao, D. C. ; Hunt, Steven ; Klein, Samuel ; Neuman, Rosalind J. ; Permutt, M. Alan ; Abumrad, Nada A. / Variants in the CD36 gene associate with the metabolic syndrome and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In: Human Molecular Genetics. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 11. pp. 1695-1704.
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