Using quantum games to teach quantum mechanics, part 2

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introductory courses in computational and quantum chemistry introduce topics such as Hilbert spaces, basis set expansions, and observable matrices. These topics are fundamental in the practice of quantum computations in chemistry as most computational methods rely on basis sets to approximate the true wave function. The mechanics of these topics can easily and intuitively be shown through the use of the game quantum tic-tac-toe (QTTT). Herein we propose a series of activities, using the mechanics of both classical tic-tac-toe (CTTT) and QTTT, intended to assist in the student's understanding of these quantum chemistry topics by exploiting their intuitive comprehension of the game. Quantum tic-tac-toe QTTT is a quantum analogue of CTTT and can be used to demonstrate the use of superposition in movement, qualitative (and later quantitative) displays of entanglement, and state collapse due to observation. QTTT can be used for the benefit of the student's comprehension in several other topics with the aid of proper discussion. This paper is the second in a series on the topic published in this Journal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-427
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Chemical Education
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quantum chemistry
Quantum theory
mechanic
Mechanics
chemistry
Students
Computational chemistry
Quantum computers
Hilbert spaces
comprehension
Wave functions
Computational methods
Display devices
student

Keywords

  • First-Year Undergraduate/General
  • Hands-On Learning/Manipulatives
  • High School/Introductory Chemistry
  • Humor/Puzzles/Games
  • Physical Chemistry
  • Quantum Chemistry
  • Student-Centered Learning
  • Upper-Division Undergraduate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Using quantum games to teach quantum mechanics, part 2. / Hoehn, Ross; MacK, Nick; Kais, Sabre.

In: Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 91, No. 3, 11.03.2014, p. 423-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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