Using 'collective omics data' for biomedical research training

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Abstract

Systems-scale molecular profiling data accumulating in public repositories may constitute a useful resource for immunologists. It is for instance likely that information relevant to their chosen line of research be found among the more than 90,000 data series available in the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus. Such 'collective omics data' may also be employed as source material for training purposes. This is the case when training curricula aim at the development of bioinformatics skills necessary for the analysis, interpretation or visualization of data generated on global scales. But 'collective omics data' may also be reused for training purposes to foster the development of the skills and 'mental habits' underpinning traditional reductionist science approaches. This review describes a small-scale initiative involving investigators, for the most part immunologists, having engaged in a range of training activities relying on 'collective omics data'.

Original languageEnglish
JournalImmunology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Computational Biology
Curriculum
Habits
Biomedical Research
Teaching
Research Personnel
Gene Expression
Research

Keywords

  • Bioinformatics
  • Genomics
  • Transcriptomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "Systems-scale molecular profiling data accumulating in public repositories may constitute a useful resource for immunologists. It is for instance likely that information relevant to their chosen line of research be found among the more than 90,000 data series available in the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus. Such 'collective omics data' may also be employed as source material for training purposes. This is the case when training curricula aim at the development of bioinformatics skills necessary for the analysis, interpretation or visualization of data generated on global scales. But 'collective omics data' may also be reused for training purposes to foster the development of the skills and 'mental habits' underpinning traditional reductionist science approaches. This review describes a small-scale initiative involving investigators, for the most part immunologists, having engaged in a range of training activities relying on 'collective omics data'.",
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