Understanding why students drop out of high school, According to their own reports

Are they pushed or pulled, Or do they fall out? a comparative analysis of seven nationally representative studies

Jonathan Jacob Doll, Zohreh Eslami, Lynne Walters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on school dropout extends from early 20th-century pioneers until now, marking trends of causes and prevention. However, specific dropout causes reported by students from several nationally representative studies have never been examined together, which, if done, could lead to a better understanding of the dropout problem. Push, pull, and falling out factors provide a framework for understanding dropouts. Push factors include school-consequence on attendance or discipline. Pull factors include out-of-school enticements like jobs and family. Finally, falling out factors refer to disengagement in students not caused by school or outside pulling factors. Since 1966, most nationally representative studies depicted pull factors as ranking the highest. Also, administrators in one study corroborated pull out factors for younger dropouts, not older ones, while most recent research cites push factors as highest overall. One rationale for this change is a response to rising standards from No Child Left Behind (NCLB), which can be ultimately tested only by future dropout research.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSAGE Open
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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drop-out
school
student
cause
disengagement
Comparative Analysis
Fallout
High School
Drop out
ranking
trend

Keywords

  • Academics
  • Disparities
  • Education
  • Educational measurement and assessment
  • History and sociology of education
  • Social sciences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

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