Ultra-high oxidation resistance of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube bundles grown by an "all-laser" process

J. H. Yi, Brahim Aissa, M. A. El Khakani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were laterally grown on SiO 2/Si substrates by means of an "all-laser" growth process. Our "all-laser" process stands out by its exclusive use of the same pulsed UV laser, first, to deposit the CoNi nanocatalyst and, second, to grow SWCNTs through the laser ablation of a pure graphite target. The "all-laser" grown SWCNTs generally self-assemble into bundles (5-15 nm-diam.) sprouting from the CoNi nanocatalyst and laterally bridging the 2 μm gap separating adjacent catalysed electrodes (in either "suspended" or "on-substrate" geometries). A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of both suspended and on-substrate SWCNTs was achieved. The "all-laser" grown SWCNTs were subjected to annealing under flowing oxygen at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1100°C Systematic scanning electron microscopy observations combined with micro-Raman analyses revealed that more than 20% of suspended nanotubes were still stable at temperatures as high as 900 °C under flowing O 2 while the on-substrate counter-part were completely burnt out at this temperature. Accordingly, the activation energy, as deduced from the Arrhenius plot, of the suspended SWCNTs is found to be as high as ∼180 kJ mol -1 (∼9 times higher than that of the on-substrate ones). The high quality (almost defect-free) of the nanotubes synthesized by the "all-laser" approach, their protected tips into the embedded CoNi catalyst nanolayer together with their suspended geometry are thought to be responsible for their unprecedented ultra-high oxidation resistance. This opens up new prospects for the use of these suspended nanotubes into nanodevices that have to operate under highly oxidizing environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3394-3399
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
oxidation resistance
Oxidation resistance
bundles
Carbon nanotubes
Lasers
carbon nanotubes
Nanotubes
lasers
Substrates
nanotubes
Temperature
Arrhenius plots
Graphite
Geometry
Laser Therapy
Laser ablation
geometry
ultraviolet lasers
Electron Scanning Microscopy

Keywords

  • All-laser process
  • Single-wall carbon nanotubes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Materials Science (miscellaneous)
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Ultra-high oxidation resistance of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube bundles grown by an "all-laser" process. / Yi, J. H.; Aissa, Brahim; El Khakani, M. A.

In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Vol. 7, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 3394-3399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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