Tolerating bounded inconsistency for increasing concurrency in database systems

M. H. Wong, D. Agrawal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, the scope of databases has been extended to many non-standard applications, and serializability is found to be too restrictive for such applications. In general, two approaches are adopted to address this problem. The first approach considers placing more structure on data objects to exploit type specific properties while keeping serializability as the correctness criterion. The other approach uses explicit semantics of transactions and databases to permit interleaved executions of transactions that are non-serializable. In this paper, we attempt to bridge the gap between the two approaches by using the notion of serializability with bounded inconsistency. Users are free to specify the maximum level of inconsistency that can be allowed in the executions of operations dynamically. In particular, if no inconsistency is allowed in the execution of any operation, the protocol will be reduced to a standard strict two phase locking protocol based on type-specific semantics of data objects. Bounded inconsistency can be applied to many areas which do not require exact values of the data such as for gathering information for statistical purpose, for making high level decisions and reasoning in expert systems which can tolerate uncertainty in input data.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems
Editors Anon
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherPubl by ACM
Pages236-245
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)0897915194
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1992
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 11th ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems - San Diego, CA, USA
Duration: 2 Jun 19924 Jun 1992

Other

OtherProceedings of the 11th ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems
CitySan Diego, CA, USA
Period2/6/924/6/92

Fingerprint

Semantics
Expert systems
Uncertainty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

Cite this

Wong, M. H., & Agrawal, D. (1992). Tolerating bounded inconsistency for increasing concurrency in database systems. In Anon (Ed.), Proceedings of the ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems (pp. 236-245). New York, NY, United States: Publ by ACM.

Tolerating bounded inconsistency for increasing concurrency in database systems. / Wong, M. H.; Agrawal, D.

Proceedings of the ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems. ed. / Anon. New York, NY, United States : Publ by ACM, 1992. p. 236-245.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wong, MH & Agrawal, D 1992, Tolerating bounded inconsistency for increasing concurrency in database systems. in Anon (ed.), Proceedings of the ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems. Publ by ACM, New York, NY, United States, pp. 236-245, Proceedings of the 11th ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems, San Diego, CA, USA, 2/6/92.
Wong MH, Agrawal D. Tolerating bounded inconsistency for increasing concurrency in database systems. In Anon, editor, Proceedings of the ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems. New York, NY, United States: Publ by ACM. 1992. p. 236-245
Wong, M. H. ; Agrawal, D. / Tolerating bounded inconsistency for increasing concurrency in database systems. Proceedings of the ACM SIGACT-SIGMOD-SIGART Symposium on Principles of Database Systems. editor / Anon. New York, NY, United States : Publ by ACM, 1992. pp. 236-245
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