The road to popularity

The dilution of growing audience on Twitter

Przemyslaw A. Grabowicz, Juhi Kulshrestha, Mahmoudreza Babaei, Ingmar Weber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

On social media platforms, like Twitter, users are often interested in gaining more influence and popularity by growing their set of followers, aka their audience. Several studies have described the properties of users on Twitter based on static snapshots of their follower network. Other studies have analyzed the general process of link formation. Here, rather than investigating the dynamics of this process itself, we study how the characteristics of the audience and follower links change as the audience of a user grows in size on the road to user's popularity. To begin with, we find that the early followers tend to be more elite users than the late followers, i.e., they are more likely to have verified and expert accounts. Moreover, the early followers are significantly more similar to the person that they follow than the late followers. Namely, they are more likely to share time zone, language, and topics of interests with the followed user. To some extent, these phenomena are related with the growth of Twitter itself, wherein the early followers tend to be the early adopters of Twitter, while the late followers are late adopters. We isolate, however, the effect of the growth of audiences consisting of followers from the growth of Twitter's user base itself. Finally, we measure the engagement of such audiences with the content of the followed user, by measuring the probability that an early or late follower becomes a retweeter.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016
PublisherAAAI Press
Pages567-570
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781577357582
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016 - Cologne, Germany
Duration: 17 May 201620 May 2016

Other

Other10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016
CountryGermany
CityCologne
Period17/5/1620/5/16

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Grabowicz, P. A., Kulshrestha, J., Babaei, M., & Weber, I. (2016). The road to popularity: The dilution of growing audience on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016 (pp. 567-570). AAAI Press.

The road to popularity : The dilution of growing audience on Twitter. / Grabowicz, Przemyslaw A.; Kulshrestha, Juhi; Babaei, Mahmoudreza; Weber, Ingmar.

Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press, 2016. p. 567-570.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Grabowicz, PA, Kulshrestha, J, Babaei, M & Weber, I 2016, The road to popularity: The dilution of growing audience on Twitter. in Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press, pp. 567-570, 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016, Cologne, Germany, 17/5/16.
Grabowicz PA, Kulshrestha J, Babaei M, Weber I. The road to popularity: The dilution of growing audience on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press. 2016. p. 567-570
Grabowicz, Przemyslaw A. ; Kulshrestha, Juhi ; Babaei, Mahmoudreza ; Weber, Ingmar. / The road to popularity : The dilution of growing audience on Twitter. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Web and Social Media, ICWSM 2016. AAAI Press, 2016. pp. 567-570
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