The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations

Korana Stipetic, Yu Chen Chang, Kenlyn Peters, Ahmed Salem, Sanjay H. Doiphode, Patrick L. McDonough, Yung Fu Chang, Ali Sultan, Hussni O. Mohammed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are foodborne pathogens of global importance. We assessed their risks and associated factors in a highly dynamic population of animals. Animal and environmental samples were collected from dairy cattle, sheep, camel and chickens at either the farms or the abattoirs. The pathogens were detected using a combination of bacterial enrichment culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Data on putative risk factors were collect and analysed for their significance of association with these pathogens. Salmonella spp. were detected at higher proportions in sheep faeces and sheep carcasses in comparison to cattle faeces (odds ratio = 2.4 and 2.2, respectively). This pathogen was less common in milk or carcasses samples from cattle or chickens. Sheep and camel carcass samples were highly contaminated with Salmonella spp. Faecal samples from cattle had the most diverse serovars of Salmonella enterica including S. Newport, S. Haifa, S. Kedougou, S. Kentucky, S. Mbandaka and S. Goettingen. Exotic serovars in sheep included S. Eastbourne, S. Chester and S. Kottnus. Serovars that were shed in camel faeces included S. Newport, S. Bovismorbificans and S. Infantis. In all sampled populations, detection of Salmonella spp. was more likely during warmer months than cold months. Listeria monocytogenes was not common in the targeted populations and was detected at a rate of 2.4%, mainly from sheep carcasses. The study highlights the role of food animals as reservoirs of pathogens across boundaries since all feed are imported in that population from different parts of the world.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-254
Number of pages9
JournalVeterinary Medicine and Science
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

Fingerprint

Population Dynamics
Listeria monocytogenes
food animals
Salmonella
Sheep
population dynamics
camels
ovine carcasses
sheep
Food
Camelus
serotypes
pathogens
feces
Feces
cattle
chickens
sampling
enrichment culture
Chickens

Keywords

  • Foodborne
  • foodborne pathogens
  • Listeria monocytogenes
  • preharvest
  • Salmonella spp.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Stipetic, K., Chang, Y. C., Peters, K., Salem, A., Doiphode, S. H., McDonough, P. L., ... Mohammed, H. O. (2016). The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations. Veterinary Medicine and Science, 2(4), 246-254. https://doi.org/10.1002/vms3.39

The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations. / Stipetic, Korana; Chang, Yu Chen; Peters, Kenlyn; Salem, Ahmed; Doiphode, Sanjay H.; McDonough, Patrick L.; Chang, Yung Fu; Sultan, Ali; Mohammed, Hussni O.

In: Veterinary Medicine and Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.11.2016, p. 246-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stipetic, K, Chang, YC, Peters, K, Salem, A, Doiphode, SH, McDonough, PL, Chang, YF, Sultan, A & Mohammed, HO 2016, 'The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations', Veterinary Medicine and Science, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 246-254. https://doi.org/10.1002/vms3.39
Stipetic, Korana ; Chang, Yu Chen ; Peters, Kenlyn ; Salem, Ahmed ; Doiphode, Sanjay H. ; McDonough, Patrick L. ; Chang, Yung Fu ; Sultan, Ali ; Mohammed, Hussni O. / The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations. In: Veterinary Medicine and Science. 2016 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 246-254.
@article{ff4a5d6a3d4f49369537cb72e7cc3964,
title = "The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations",
abstract = "Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are foodborne pathogens of global importance. We assessed their risks and associated factors in a highly dynamic population of animals. Animal and environmental samples were collected from dairy cattle, sheep, camel and chickens at either the farms or the abattoirs. The pathogens were detected using a combination of bacterial enrichment culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Data on putative risk factors were collect and analysed for their significance of association with these pathogens. Salmonella spp. were detected at higher proportions in sheep faeces and sheep carcasses in comparison to cattle faeces (odds ratio = 2.4 and 2.2, respectively). This pathogen was less common in milk or carcasses samples from cattle or chickens. Sheep and camel carcass samples were highly contaminated with Salmonella spp. Faecal samples from cattle had the most diverse serovars of Salmonella enterica including S. Newport, S. Haifa, S. Kedougou, S. Kentucky, S. Mbandaka and S. Goettingen. Exotic serovars in sheep included S. Eastbourne, S. Chester and S. Kottnus. Serovars that were shed in camel faeces included S. Newport, S. Bovismorbificans and S. Infantis. In all sampled populations, detection of Salmonella spp. was more likely during warmer months than cold months. Listeria monocytogenes was not common in the targeted populations and was detected at a rate of 2.4{\%}, mainly from sheep carcasses. The study highlights the role of food animals as reservoirs of pathogens across boundaries since all feed are imported in that population from different parts of the world.",
keywords = "Foodborne, foodborne pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes, preharvest, Salmonella spp.",
author = "Korana Stipetic and Chang, {Yu Chen} and Kenlyn Peters and Ahmed Salem and Doiphode, {Sanjay H.} and McDonough, {Patrick L.} and Chang, {Yung Fu} and Ali Sultan and Mohammed, {Hussni O.}",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/vms3.39",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "246--254",
journal = "Veterinary Medicine and Science",
issn = "2053-1095",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The risk of carriage of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food animals in dynamic populations

AU - Stipetic, Korana

AU - Chang, Yu Chen

AU - Peters, Kenlyn

AU - Salem, Ahmed

AU - Doiphode, Sanjay H.

AU - McDonough, Patrick L.

AU - Chang, Yung Fu

AU - Sultan, Ali

AU - Mohammed, Hussni O.

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are foodborne pathogens of global importance. We assessed their risks and associated factors in a highly dynamic population of animals. Animal and environmental samples were collected from dairy cattle, sheep, camel and chickens at either the farms or the abattoirs. The pathogens were detected using a combination of bacterial enrichment culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Data on putative risk factors were collect and analysed for their significance of association with these pathogens. Salmonella spp. were detected at higher proportions in sheep faeces and sheep carcasses in comparison to cattle faeces (odds ratio = 2.4 and 2.2, respectively). This pathogen was less common in milk or carcasses samples from cattle or chickens. Sheep and camel carcass samples were highly contaminated with Salmonella spp. Faecal samples from cattle had the most diverse serovars of Salmonella enterica including S. Newport, S. Haifa, S. Kedougou, S. Kentucky, S. Mbandaka and S. Goettingen. Exotic serovars in sheep included S. Eastbourne, S. Chester and S. Kottnus. Serovars that were shed in camel faeces included S. Newport, S. Bovismorbificans and S. Infantis. In all sampled populations, detection of Salmonella spp. was more likely during warmer months than cold months. Listeria monocytogenes was not common in the targeted populations and was detected at a rate of 2.4%, mainly from sheep carcasses. The study highlights the role of food animals as reservoirs of pathogens across boundaries since all feed are imported in that population from different parts of the world.

AB - Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are foodborne pathogens of global importance. We assessed their risks and associated factors in a highly dynamic population of animals. Animal and environmental samples were collected from dairy cattle, sheep, camel and chickens at either the farms or the abattoirs. The pathogens were detected using a combination of bacterial enrichment culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Data on putative risk factors were collect and analysed for their significance of association with these pathogens. Salmonella spp. were detected at higher proportions in sheep faeces and sheep carcasses in comparison to cattle faeces (odds ratio = 2.4 and 2.2, respectively). This pathogen was less common in milk or carcasses samples from cattle or chickens. Sheep and camel carcass samples were highly contaminated with Salmonella spp. Faecal samples from cattle had the most diverse serovars of Salmonella enterica including S. Newport, S. Haifa, S. Kedougou, S. Kentucky, S. Mbandaka and S. Goettingen. Exotic serovars in sheep included S. Eastbourne, S. Chester and S. Kottnus. Serovars that were shed in camel faeces included S. Newport, S. Bovismorbificans and S. Infantis. In all sampled populations, detection of Salmonella spp. was more likely during warmer months than cold months. Listeria monocytogenes was not common in the targeted populations and was detected at a rate of 2.4%, mainly from sheep carcasses. The study highlights the role of food animals as reservoirs of pathogens across boundaries since all feed are imported in that population from different parts of the world.

KW - Foodborne

KW - foodborne pathogens

KW - Listeria monocytogenes

KW - preharvest

KW - Salmonella spp.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050480095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85050480095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/vms3.39

DO - 10.1002/vms3.39

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85050480095

VL - 2

SP - 246

EP - 254

JO - Veterinary Medicine and Science

JF - Veterinary Medicine and Science

SN - 2053-1095

IS - 4

ER -