The National Institutes of Health Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation

History and progress

Howard B. Dickler, J. Philip Mccoy, Robert Nussenblatt, Shira Perl, Pamela A. Schwartzberg, John S. Tsang, Ena Wang, Neil S. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation (CHI) is an exciting initiative of the NIH intramural program begun in 2009. It is uniquely trans-NIH in support (multiple institutes) and leadership (senior scientists from several institutes who donate their time). Its goal is an in-depth assessment of the human immune system using high-throughput multiplex technologies for examination of immune cells and their products, the genome, gene expression, and epigenetic modulation obtained from individuals both before and after interventions, adding information from in-depth clinical phenotyping, and then applying advanced biostatistical and computer modeling methods for mining these diverse data. The aim is to develop a comprehensive picture of the human "immunome" in health and disease, elucidate common pathogenic pathways in various diseases, identify and validate biomarkers that predict disease progression and responses to new interventions, and identify potential targets for new therapeutic modalities. Challenges, opportunities, and progress are detailed. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-147
Number of pages15
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1285
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immunology
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Allergy and Immunology
Autoimmunity
History
Health
Inflammation
Data Mining
Public Sector
Immune system
Biomarkers
Epigenomics
Gene expression
Disease Progression
Immune System
Genes
Throughput
Modulation
Genome
Technology

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Human
  • Immunology
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Dickler, H. B., Mccoy, J. P., Nussenblatt, R., Perl, S., Schwartzberg, P. A., Tsang, J. S., ... Young, N. S. (2013). The National Institutes of Health Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation: History and progress. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1285(1), 133-147. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.12101

The National Institutes of Health Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation : History and progress. / Dickler, Howard B.; Mccoy, J. Philip; Nussenblatt, Robert; Perl, Shira; Schwartzberg, Pamela A.; Tsang, John S.; Wang, Ena; Young, Neil S.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1285, No. 1, 05.2013, p. 133-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dickler, Howard B. ; Mccoy, J. Philip ; Nussenblatt, Robert ; Perl, Shira ; Schwartzberg, Pamela A. ; Tsang, John S. ; Wang, Ena ; Young, Neil S. / The National Institutes of Health Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation : History and progress. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 1285, No. 1. pp. 133-147.
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