The mesh of civilizations in the global network of digital communication

Bogdan State, Patrick Park, Ingmar Weber, Michael Macy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conflicts fueled by popular religious mobilization have rekindled the controversy surrounding Samuel Huntington's theory of changing international alignments in the Post-Cold War era. In The Clash of Civilizations, Huntington challenged Fukuyama's "end of history" thesis that liberal democracy had emerged victorious out of Post-war ideological and economic rivalries. Based on a top-down analysis of the alignments of nation states, Huntington famously concluded that the axes of international geo-political conflicts had reverted to the ancient cultural divisions that had characterized most of human history. Until recently, however, the debate has had to rely more on polemics than empirical evidence. Moreover, Huntington made this prediction in 1993, before social media connected the world's population. Do digital communications attenuate or echo the cultural, religious, and ethnic "fault lines" posited by Huntington prior to the global diffusion of social media? We revisit Huntington's thesis using hundreds of millions of anonymized email and Twitter communications among tens of millions of worldwide users to map the global alignment of interpersonal relations. Contrary to the supposedly borderless world of cyberspace, a bottom-up analysis confirms the persistence of the eight culturally differentiated civilizations posited by Huntington, with the divisions corresponding to differences in language, religion, economic development, and spatial distance.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0122543
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2015

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Social Media
Civilization
social networks
communication (human)
History
Communication
Democracy
interpersonal relationships
religion
e-mail
history
Economic Development
Religion
Interpersonal Relations
economic development
Economics
Language
Electronic mail
economics
prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The mesh of civilizations in the global network of digital communication. / State, Bogdan; Park, Patrick; Weber, Ingmar; Macy, Michael.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 5, e0122543, 29.05.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

State, Bogdan ; Park, Patrick ; Weber, Ingmar ; Macy, Michael. / The mesh of civilizations in the global network of digital communication. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 5.
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