The impact of obesity intervention on cancer

Clinical perspectives

Ted D. Adams, Jessica L J Greenwood, Steven Hunt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Previous chapters have clearly demonstrated the underlying association between obesity and risk of specific cancer types, with particular attention focused on the role of adipose tissue in cancer development. In addition to cancer incidence risk attributed to obesity, increasing cancer recurrence risk may also be associated with obesity (Ligibel, Oncology (Williston Park) 25(11):994-1000, 2011; Protani et al., Breast Cancer Res Treat 123(3):627-635, 2010; Patlak & Nass, The role of obesity in cancer survival and recurrence: workshop summary, The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2012; Hewitt et al., From cancer patient to cancer survivor: lost in the transition. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, Washington, DC, 2005; Demark-Wahnefried et al., Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 21(8): 1244-1259, 2012). Given the positive link between obesity and increased cancer risk, it should follow that cancer risk reduction could be achieved through intervention efforts to prevent patients from becoming overweight or obese or through weight loss in patients already identified as overweight or obese. Unfortunately, evidence supporting a favorable link between voluntary weight loss and subsequent reduced cancer risk is limited and not as conclusive as research findings that clearly demonstrate greater cancer risk with obesity. This chapter highlights the proposed clinical approaches for treating adult obesity, including bariatric surgery, and explores the degree to which these obesity interventions have been shown to favorably impact cancer incidence and cancer recurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdipose tissue and cancer
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages165-187
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781461476603
ISBN (Print)1461476593, 9781461476597
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Obesity
Neoplasms
Recurrence
Weight Loss
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Bariatric Surgery
Incidence
Risk Reduction Behavior
Tumor Biomarkers
Survivors
Adipose Tissue
Breast Neoplasms
Education
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Adams, T. D., Greenwood, J. L. J., & Hunt, S. (2013). The impact of obesity intervention on cancer: Clinical perspectives. In Adipose tissue and cancer (pp. 165-187). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7660-3_9

The impact of obesity intervention on cancer : Clinical perspectives. / Adams, Ted D.; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Hunt, Steven.

Adipose tissue and cancer. Springer New York, 2013. p. 165-187.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Adams, TD, Greenwood, JLJ & Hunt, S 2013, The impact of obesity intervention on cancer: Clinical perspectives. in Adipose tissue and cancer. Springer New York, pp. 165-187. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7660-3_9
Adams TD, Greenwood JLJ, Hunt S. The impact of obesity intervention on cancer: Clinical perspectives. In Adipose tissue and cancer. Springer New York. 2013. p. 165-187 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7660-3_9
Adams, Ted D. ; Greenwood, Jessica L J ; Hunt, Steven. / The impact of obesity intervention on cancer : Clinical perspectives. Adipose tissue and cancer. Springer New York, 2013. pp. 165-187
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