The effects of age on recall of information from a simulated television news broadcast

Robert D. Hill, Thomas H. Crook, Anastasia Zadek, Javaid Sheikh, Jerome Yesavage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recall of factual information from a news broadcast was assessed in 267 adults who were young, middle-aged, or elderly. Participants listened to a 6-min simulated news program, and at the conclusion of the program were asked 25 factual questions related to the content of the broadcast. A significant age effect was noted, with older adults recalling less information than the younger-aged groups. Performance on this task positively correlated with a measure of prose recall and self-reports of everyday memory. Results suggest that a computer-simulated task may be a useful medium for assessing everyday memory performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)607-613
Number of pages7
JournalEducational Gerontology
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Television
broadcast
television
news
Task Performance and Analysis
Self Report
performance
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Education
  • Ageing

Cite this

The effects of age on recall of information from a simulated television news broadcast. / Hill, Robert D.; Crook, Thomas H.; Zadek, Anastasia; Sheikh, Javaid; Yesavage, Jerome.

In: Educational Gerontology, Vol. 15, No. 6, 1989, p. 607-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hill, Robert D. ; Crook, Thomas H. ; Zadek, Anastasia ; Sheikh, Javaid ; Yesavage, Jerome. / The effects of age on recall of information from a simulated television news broadcast. In: Educational Gerontology. 1989 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 607-613.
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