The effect of brand awareness on the evaluation of search engine results

Bernard Jansen, Mimi Zhang, Ying Zhang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the effect of search engine brand (i.e., identifying name that distinguishes a product from its competitors) on evaluation of system performance. Our research is motivated by the large amount of search traffic directed to less than a handful of Web search engines, even though many are of equal technical quality with similar interfaces. We conducted a laboratory experiment with 32 participants measuring the effect of four search engine brands while controlling for the quality of search engine results. Based on average relevance ratings, there was a 25% difference between the most highly rated search engine and the lowest, even though search engine results were identical in both content and presentation. We discuss implications for search engine marketing and the design of empirical studies measuring search engine quality.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Pages2471-2476
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event25th SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007, CHI 2007 - San Jose, CA
Duration: 28 Apr 20073 May 2007

Other

Other25th SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007, CHI 2007
CitySan Jose, CA
Period28/4/073/5/07

Fingerprint

Search engines
search engine
evaluation
laboratory experiment
Marketing
marketing
rating
traffic
performance

Keywords

  • Search engines
  • User intent
  • Web queries
  • Web searching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Jansen, B., Zhang, M., & Zhang, Y. (2007). The effect of brand awareness on the evaluation of search engine results. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 2471-2476) https://doi.org/10.1145/1240866.1241026

The effect of brand awareness on the evaluation of search engine results. / Jansen, Bernard; Zhang, Mimi; Zhang, Ying.

Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2007. p. 2471-2476.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jansen, B, Zhang, M & Zhang, Y 2007, The effect of brand awareness on the evaluation of search engine results. in Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. pp. 2471-2476, 25th SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007, CHI 2007, San Jose, CA, 28/4/07. https://doi.org/10.1145/1240866.1241026
Jansen B, Zhang M, Zhang Y. The effect of brand awareness on the evaluation of search engine results. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2007. p. 2471-2476 https://doi.org/10.1145/1240866.1241026
Jansen, Bernard ; Zhang, Mimi ; Zhang, Ying. / The effect of brand awareness on the evaluation of search engine results. Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. 2007. pp. 2471-2476
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