The effect of biliopancreatic diversion surgery on renal function - A retrospective study

Biju Jose, Stephen Ford, Paul Super, G. Neil Thomas, Indranil Dasgupta, Shahrad Taheri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The prevalences of obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased simultaneously. Should a pathophysiological relationship exist between the two conditions, bariatric surgery and associated weight loss could be an important intervention in extremely obese individuals to slow the progression of CKD. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 25 patients who had undergone biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery for extreme obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m2), with mean follow-up of 4 years. We assessed pre- and post-surgery renal function, body weight and blood pressure (BP) obtained from electronic hospital and primary care records. Results: There was a significant reduction in mean body weight at 4 years by 50.3 kg (SD = 20.65). The creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) also improved significantly: serum creatinine reduced by 16.2 μmol/l (SD = 19.57) while the eGFR improved by 10.6 ml/min/m2 (SD = 15.45). The greatest improvement in eGFR was in the group (n = 7) with eGFR ≤60 ml/min/m2. A subset of patients (n = 11) had evaluable BP readings and had a reduction in BP of 17/10 mmHg (SD = 33/12). Conclusions: This retrospective study demonstrates a clinically significant improvement in renal function following BPD. Several mechanisms including weight loss could account for the positive impact on renal function. The physiology underlying this improvement requires further study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)634-637
Number of pages4
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biliopancreatic Diversion
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Retrospective Studies
Kidney
Blood Pressure
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Weight Loss
Creatinine
Obesity
Body Weight
Bariatric Surgery
Reading
Primary Health Care
Body Mass Index
Serum

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Obesity
  • Renal function
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The effect of biliopancreatic diversion surgery on renal function - A retrospective study. / Jose, Biju; Ford, Stephen; Super, Paul; Thomas, G. Neil; Dasgupta, Indranil; Taheri, Shahrad.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 634-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jose, Biju ; Ford, Stephen ; Super, Paul ; Thomas, G. Neil ; Dasgupta, Indranil ; Taheri, Shahrad. / The effect of biliopancreatic diversion surgery on renal function - A retrospective study. In: Obesity Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 634-637.
@article{5c70c324d2be43f6926c42b1da499cd7,
title = "The effect of biliopancreatic diversion surgery on renal function - A retrospective study",
abstract = "Background: The prevalences of obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased simultaneously. Should a pathophysiological relationship exist between the two conditions, bariatric surgery and associated weight loss could be an important intervention in extremely obese individuals to slow the progression of CKD. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 25 patients who had undergone biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery for extreme obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m2), with mean follow-up of 4 years. We assessed pre- and post-surgery renal function, body weight and blood pressure (BP) obtained from electronic hospital and primary care records. Results: There was a significant reduction in mean body weight at 4 years by 50.3 kg (SD = 20.65). The creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) also improved significantly: serum creatinine reduced by 16.2 μmol/l (SD = 19.57) while the eGFR improved by 10.6 ml/min/m2 (SD = 15.45). The greatest improvement in eGFR was in the group (n = 7) with eGFR ≤60 ml/min/m2. A subset of patients (n = 11) had evaluable BP readings and had a reduction in BP of 17/10 mmHg (SD = 33/12). Conclusions: This retrospective study demonstrates a clinically significant improvement in renal function following BPD. Several mechanisms including weight loss could account for the positive impact on renal function. The physiology underlying this improvement requires further study.",
keywords = "Bariatric surgery, Obesity, Renal function, Weight loss",
author = "Biju Jose and Stephen Ford and Paul Super and Thomas, {G. Neil} and Indranil Dasgupta and Shahrad Taheri",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s11695-012-0851-5",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "634--637",
journal = "Obesity Surgery",
issn = "0960-8923",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of biliopancreatic diversion surgery on renal function - A retrospective study

AU - Jose, Biju

AU - Ford, Stephen

AU - Super, Paul

AU - Thomas, G. Neil

AU - Dasgupta, Indranil

AU - Taheri, Shahrad

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - Background: The prevalences of obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased simultaneously. Should a pathophysiological relationship exist between the two conditions, bariatric surgery and associated weight loss could be an important intervention in extremely obese individuals to slow the progression of CKD. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 25 patients who had undergone biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery for extreme obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m2), with mean follow-up of 4 years. We assessed pre- and post-surgery renal function, body weight and blood pressure (BP) obtained from electronic hospital and primary care records. Results: There was a significant reduction in mean body weight at 4 years by 50.3 kg (SD = 20.65). The creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) also improved significantly: serum creatinine reduced by 16.2 μmol/l (SD = 19.57) while the eGFR improved by 10.6 ml/min/m2 (SD = 15.45). The greatest improvement in eGFR was in the group (n = 7) with eGFR ≤60 ml/min/m2. A subset of patients (n = 11) had evaluable BP readings and had a reduction in BP of 17/10 mmHg (SD = 33/12). Conclusions: This retrospective study demonstrates a clinically significant improvement in renal function following BPD. Several mechanisms including weight loss could account for the positive impact on renal function. The physiology underlying this improvement requires further study.

AB - Background: The prevalences of obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased simultaneously. Should a pathophysiological relationship exist between the two conditions, bariatric surgery and associated weight loss could be an important intervention in extremely obese individuals to slow the progression of CKD. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 25 patients who had undergone biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery for extreme obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m2), with mean follow-up of 4 years. We assessed pre- and post-surgery renal function, body weight and blood pressure (BP) obtained from electronic hospital and primary care records. Results: There was a significant reduction in mean body weight at 4 years by 50.3 kg (SD = 20.65). The creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) also improved significantly: serum creatinine reduced by 16.2 μmol/l (SD = 19.57) while the eGFR improved by 10.6 ml/min/m2 (SD = 15.45). The greatest improvement in eGFR was in the group (n = 7) with eGFR ≤60 ml/min/m2. A subset of patients (n = 11) had evaluable BP readings and had a reduction in BP of 17/10 mmHg (SD = 33/12). Conclusions: This retrospective study demonstrates a clinically significant improvement in renal function following BPD. Several mechanisms including weight loss could account for the positive impact on renal function. The physiology underlying this improvement requires further study.

KW - Bariatric surgery

KW - Obesity

KW - Renal function

KW - Weight loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876483198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84876483198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11695-012-0851-5

DO - 10.1007/s11695-012-0851-5

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 634

EP - 637

JO - Obesity Surgery

JF - Obesity Surgery

SN - 0960-8923

IS - 5

ER -