The control of apparent wettability on the efficiency of surfactant flooding in tight carbonate rocks

Harris Sajjad Rabbani, Yossra Osman, Ibrahim Almaghrabi, Mohammad Azizur Rahman, Thomas Seers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this research, a state-of-the-art experimental core flooding setup is used to assess the efficiency of surfactant flooding as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technique in tight carbonate rocks. Specifically, we investigate the role of apparent wettability in governing the effectiveness of surfactant flooding. A series of flooding experiments with well-defined boundary conditions were performed on the low permeability core plug samples of Indiana Limestone (calcite-cemented carbonate grainstones). Experiments were conducted on three samples exhibiting differing apparent wetting characteristics: strongly oil-wet, moderately oil-wet and weakly oil-wet. Initially, the oil-saturated core samples were flooded with brine until the residual oil saturation was achieved, with surfactant flooding performed as a tertiary recovery technique. Interestingly, our experimental results reveal that the efficiency of surfactant flooding increases with the degree of oil-wetness of the tight carbonate rocks. The strongly oil-wet core showed the highest recovery, while the weakly oil-wet core manifested the least additional oil recovery associated with surfactant flooding. Moreover, we provided a pore-scale argument that explains the macroscopic role of surfactant flooding in tight carbonate rocks. We hypothesized that at the pore-scale the presence of thin film plays a critical role in controlling the effectiveness of surfactant flooding in the strongly oil-wet tight carbonate rocks. Overall, we believe that our macroscopic study provides novel insight into the dynamics of surfactant flooding in tight carbonate reservoirs and can aid in optimizing the field development plans for oil recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Article number684
JournalProcesses
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Carbonates
Surface-Active Agents
Wetting
Oils
Surface active agents
Rocks
Recovery
Calcium Carbonate
Enhanced recovery
Core samples
Calcite
Limestone
Experiments
Boundary conditions

Keywords

  • Apparent wettability
  • Carbonate rock
  • Core-scale
  • Surfactant flooding
  • Water flooding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology

Cite this

The control of apparent wettability on the efficiency of surfactant flooding in tight carbonate rocks. / Rabbani, Harris Sajjad; Osman, Yossra; Almaghrabi, Ibrahim; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Seers, Thomas.

In: Processes, Vol. 7, No. 10, 684, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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