The associations between family history of coronary heart disease, physical activity, dietary intake and body size

M. L. Slattery, M. C. Schumacher, Steven Hunt, R. R. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical activity has been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) as well as several CHD risk factors. In this study, we examine the association of a positive family history of CHD and physical activity on dietary intake and body size indicators among 891 healthy young adults (18 to 39 years of age) and 471 older adults (40 to 83) observed between 1980 and 1986. Participants reported the number of times per week they walked and/or jogged one mile, biked three miles, participated in sports, or performed other intense activities. Older men with a family history of CHD reported more physical activity than men without a family history of CHD (60 % compared to 28.6 %, p = 0.002). Younger women without a family history of CHD reported more physical activity than women with a family history of CHD (30.2 % compared to 15.9%; p=0.004). Fruit and vegetable intake increased with increasing levels of physical activity in younger adults. The only dietary association with family history was higher levels of fatty foods reported among older women with a family history versus those without a family history (p= 0.03). Young women with a family history of CHD were more likely to have higher BMI levels at all levels of physical activity and a higher percent of their ideal body weight per unit of physical activity (p = 0.01). For instance, young women who were most active with a family history of CHD were at 115 % of their ideal body weight, while those without a family history were at 110.2 % of their ideal body weight. There were no significant interactions between physical activity and CHD family history in this population. These findings suggest that family history of CHD alone may not be adequate to stimulate one to adopt a more healthy lifestyle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Body Size
Coronary Disease
Exercise
Ideal Body Weight
Young Adult
Vegetables
Sports
Fruit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The associations between family history of coronary heart disease, physical activity, dietary intake and body size. / Slattery, M. L.; Schumacher, M. C.; Hunt, Steven; Williams, R. R.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1993, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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