Systems developers define their own information needs

Vasanth Ram Srivatsan, Sandeep Purao, Bernard Jansen, Jingwen He

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Access to the right information is a significant contributor to success in many endeavors. It is, however, difficult to characterize what constitutes right information. This is an important question for systems development projects, which continue to exhibit a sub-par track record of success. This paper describes patterns of information seeking such as nature of information sought and sources of information consulted in the context of tasks performed during systems development projects. The analysis uses task-oriented information seeking as a theoretical perspective, inferring patterns from longitudinal data collected from multiple student teams engaged in real-world systems development efforts. The results show that the nature of tasks themselves varies for routine versus innovative projects, with implications for the nature of information sought and sources consulted. Some of the counter-intuitive findings include increasing incidence of genuine decision tasks over time; and use of the web for genuine decision tasks versus people for routine tasks. Implications of the findings for practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Pages5012-5022
Number of pages11
Volume8
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 6 Aug 20099 Aug 2009

Other

Other15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period6/8/099/8/09

Fingerprint

Students
system development
development project
source of information
incidence
student

Keywords

  • Information needs
  • Information seeking
  • Systems development
  • Systems integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Srivatsan, V. R., Purao, S., Jansen, B., & He, J. (2009). Systems developers define their own information needs. In 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009 (Vol. 8, pp. 5012-5022)

Systems developers define their own information needs. / Srivatsan, Vasanth Ram; Purao, Sandeep; Jansen, Bernard; He, Jingwen.

15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. Vol. 8 2009. p. 5012-5022.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Srivatsan, VR, Purao, S, Jansen, B & He, J 2009, Systems developers define their own information needs. in 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. vol. 8, pp. 5012-5022, 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009, San Francisco, CA, United States, 6/8/09.
Srivatsan VR, Purao S, Jansen B, He J. Systems developers define their own information needs. In 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. Vol. 8. 2009. p. 5012-5022
Srivatsan, Vasanth Ram ; Purao, Sandeep ; Jansen, Bernard ; He, Jingwen. / Systems developers define their own information needs. 15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009. Vol. 8 2009. pp. 5012-5022
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