Synthesis of Carbon Integration Networks Coupled with Hydrate Suppression and Dehydration Options

Rachid Klaimi, Sabla Y. Alnouri, Dhabia Al-Mohannadi, Joseph Zeaiter, Patrick Linke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The excessive increase in carbon dioxide emissions through the past several decades has raised global climate change concerns. As such, environmental policy makers have been looking into the implementation of efficient strategies that would ultimately reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emission levels, and meet strict emissions targets. As part of a national emission reduction strategy, the reduction of carbon-dioxide emissions from industrial activities has been proven to be very significant. This instigated the need for a systematic carbon integration approach that can yield cost-effective carbon integration networks, while meeting prescribed carbon dioxide emission reduction targets in industrial cities. A novel carbon integration methodology has been previously proposed as a carbon network source-sink mapping approach using a Mixed Integer Nonlinear Program (MINLP), and was found to be very effective to devise emission control strategies in industrial cities. This paper aims to further improve the design process of carbon integration networks, by coupling carbon integration networks with hydrate suppression/moisture removal options. This was found vital for the prevention of any potential hazards that are associated with the transportation of carbon dioxide in pipelines, such as hydrate formation and various corrosion effects, which may result from moisture retention. An extensive analysis of carbon capture, dehydration, inhibition, compression, and transmission options have all been incorporated into the network design process, in the course of determining cost-optimal solutions for carbon dioxide networks. The proposed approach has been illustrated using an industrial city case study.

Original languageEnglish
JournalChemical Product and Process Modeling
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 22 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Hydrates
Dehydration
Carbon
Carbon Dioxide
Synthesis
Carbon dioxide
Moisture
Design Process
Carbon capture
Emission control
Target
Greenhouse Gases
Gas emissions
Greenhouse gases
Climate change
Climate Change
Costs
Corrosion
Network Design
Hazards

Keywords

  • carbon integration
  • hydrates
  • industrial cities
  • moisture content
  • network design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Modelling and Simulation

Cite this

Synthesis of Carbon Integration Networks Coupled with Hydrate Suppression and Dehydration Options. / Klaimi, Rachid; Alnouri, Sabla Y.; Al-Mohannadi, Dhabia; Zeaiter, Joseph; Linke, Patrick.

In: Chemical Product and Process Modeling, 22.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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