Symptom differences between older depressed primary care patients with and without history of trauma

Joan M. Cook, Patricia A. Aren, Paula P. Schnurr, Javaid Sheikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The current study explored the relationship between past traumatic experiences and current depression in a sample of depressed older adult primary care patients. Method: Sixty-six patients were referred from primary care to a psychogeriatric clinic that specialized in the treatment of unipolar depressive disorders. All patients received an extensive psychological assessment. Results: Twenty-one percent had a history of trauma reported in their medical charts. Despite no differences found on a clinician-rated measure of depression, those with a trauma history had more depressive symptoms on a self-report measure. Conclusions: Although older patients with a history of trauma may not appear more depressed than a non-trauma comparison group, they may be in more psychological distress. The clinical implications of these findings and recommendations for mental health professionals are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-414
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Health Care
Wounds and Injuries
Depression
Psychology
Geriatric Psychiatry
Depressive Disorder
Self Report
Mental Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Depression
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Symptom differences between older depressed primary care patients with and without history of trauma. / Cook, Joan M.; Aren, Patricia A.; Schnurr, Paula P.; Sheikh, Javaid.

In: International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 4, 2001, p. 401-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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