Surveillance & Modesty on social media: How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition

Sarah Vieweg, Adam Hodges

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research on social media use in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has focused on their role in the Arab Spring uprisings, but less work has examined the more mundane uses of these technologies. Yet exploring the way populations in the MENA region use social media in everyday life provides insight into how they are adapted to cultural contexts beyond those from which they originated. To better understand this process, we interviewed eleven Qatari nationals currently living in Doha, Qatar. Our analysis identifies ways users, particularly females, practice modesty, manage their own (and by extension) their family's reputation, and use social media to monitor and protect others. These findings are placed within a framework of social, or participatory surveillance, which challenges conventional notions of surveillance as a form of control and instead shows how surveillance has the potential to be empowering.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages527-538
Number of pages12
Volume27
ISBN (Print)9781450335928
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2016
Event19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016 - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 27 Feb 20162 Mar 2016

Other

Other19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period27/2/162/3/16

Keywords

  • Arab studies
  • Middle east
  • Modernization
  • Modesty
  • Qatar
  • Social media
  • Surveillance
  • Tradition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Vieweg, S., & Hodges, A. (2016). Surveillance & Modesty on social media: How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition. In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW (Vol. 27, pp. 527-538). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2819966

Surveillance & Modesty on social media : How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition. / Vieweg, Sarah; Hodges, Adam.

Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. Vol. 27 Association for Computing Machinery, 2016. p. 527-538.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Vieweg, S & Hodges, A 2016, Surveillance & Modesty on social media: How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition. in Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. vol. 27, Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 527-538, 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016, San Francisco, United States, 27/2/16. https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2819966
Vieweg S, Hodges A. Surveillance & Modesty on social media: How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition. In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. Vol. 27. Association for Computing Machinery. 2016. p. 527-538 https://doi.org/10.1145/2818048.2819966
Vieweg, Sarah ; Hodges, Adam. / Surveillance & Modesty on social media : How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. Vol. 27 Association for Computing Machinery, 2016. pp. 527-538
@inproceedings{c0ddef281fe944a4b6ed05834743a46a,
title = "Surveillance & Modesty on social media: How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition",
abstract = "Recent research on social media use in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has focused on their role in the Arab Spring uprisings, but less work has examined the more mundane uses of these technologies. Yet exploring the way populations in the MENA region use social media in everyday life provides insight into how they are adapted to cultural contexts beyond those from which they originated. To better understand this process, we interviewed eleven Qatari nationals currently living in Doha, Qatar. Our analysis identifies ways users, particularly females, practice modesty, manage their own (and by extension) their family's reputation, and use social media to monitor and protect others. These findings are placed within a framework of social, or participatory surveillance, which challenges conventional notions of surveillance as a form of control and instead shows how surveillance has the potential to be empowering.",
keywords = "Arab studies, Middle east, Modernization, Modesty, Qatar, Social media, Surveillance, Tradition",
author = "Sarah Vieweg and Adam Hodges",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1145/2818048.2819966",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781450335928",
volume = "27",
pages = "527--538",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Surveillance & Modesty on social media

T2 - How qataris navigate modernity and maintain tradition

AU - Vieweg, Sarah

AU - Hodges, Adam

PY - 2016/2/27

Y1 - 2016/2/27

N2 - Recent research on social media use in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has focused on their role in the Arab Spring uprisings, but less work has examined the more mundane uses of these technologies. Yet exploring the way populations in the MENA region use social media in everyday life provides insight into how they are adapted to cultural contexts beyond those from which they originated. To better understand this process, we interviewed eleven Qatari nationals currently living in Doha, Qatar. Our analysis identifies ways users, particularly females, practice modesty, manage their own (and by extension) their family's reputation, and use social media to monitor and protect others. These findings are placed within a framework of social, or participatory surveillance, which challenges conventional notions of surveillance as a form of control and instead shows how surveillance has the potential to be empowering.

AB - Recent research on social media use in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has focused on their role in the Arab Spring uprisings, but less work has examined the more mundane uses of these technologies. Yet exploring the way populations in the MENA region use social media in everyday life provides insight into how they are adapted to cultural contexts beyond those from which they originated. To better understand this process, we interviewed eleven Qatari nationals currently living in Doha, Qatar. Our analysis identifies ways users, particularly females, practice modesty, manage their own (and by extension) their family's reputation, and use social media to monitor and protect others. These findings are placed within a framework of social, or participatory surveillance, which challenges conventional notions of surveillance as a form of control and instead shows how surveillance has the potential to be empowering.

KW - Arab studies

KW - Middle east

KW - Modernization

KW - Modesty

KW - Qatar

KW - Social media

KW - Surveillance

KW - Tradition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84963632067&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84963632067&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/2818048.2819966

DO - 10.1145/2818048.2819966

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84963632067

SN - 9781450335928

VL - 27

SP - 527

EP - 538

BT - Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW

PB - Association for Computing Machinery

ER -