Supplementation of Immunosuppressive Regimens with Calcium Channel Blockers: Rationale and Clinical Efficacy

Matthew R. Weir, Manikkam Suthanthiran

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calcium channel blockers (calcium antagonists) are a diverse group of drugs that are currently approved for the treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris. They share a similar activity, despite their dissimilar chemical structures: attenuation of the cellular influx of calcium. Since the transmembrane flux of calcium is a common signalling system for cellular biochemical processes, calcium antagonists may influence numerous cellular functions. Many of these physiological processes are important in mediating responses to vasoconstrictor substances, such as may be involved in cyclosporin-mediated hypertension, nephrotoxicity and delayed graft function. Calcium antagonists are clinically useful in cyclosporin-treated organ transplant recipients for the following reasons: (a) they reduce the incidence of delayed graft function and may serve to allow cyclosporin induction therapy, thus avoiding the use of antibody induction therapy in the immediate perioperative period; (b) they reduce cyclosporin-induced intrarenal vasoconstriction and may reduce the incidence of chronic cyclosporin-induced renal dysfunction; (c) they are the preferred antihypertensive agents in cyclosporin-treated sodium-sensitive patients. It is possible, although less likely, that calcium antagonists also: (a) exert additive immunosuppressive effects with cyclosporin, and (b) attenuate atherosclerosis and/or chronic vascular rejection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-467
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Immunotherapeutics
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Calcium Channel Blockers
Immunosuppressive Agents
Cyclosporine
Calcium
Delayed Graft Function
Biochemical Phenomena
Physiological Phenomena
Hypertension
Perioperative Period
Incidence
Angina Pectoris
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Cellular Structures
Vasoconstriction
Antihypertensive Agents
Blood Vessels
Atherosclerosis
Therapeutics
Sodium
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Supplementation of Immunosuppressive Regimens with Calcium Channel Blockers : Rationale and Clinical Efficacy. / Weir, Matthew R.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam.

In: Clinical Immunotherapeutics, Vol. 2, No. 6, 01.01.1994, p. 458-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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