Solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems

P. Singh, L. R. Pederson, S. P. Simner, J. W. Stevenson, V. V. Viswanathan

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of NO X, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 °. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)953-958
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference
    Volume2
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2001
    EventProceedings of the 36th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, IECEC - Savannah, GA, United States
    Duration: 29 Jul 20012 Aug 2001

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Fuel Technology
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Singh, P., Pederson, L. R., Simner, S. P., Stevenson, J. W., & Viswanathan, V. V. (2001). Solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. Proceedings of the Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, 2, 953-958.