Smart polymeric cathode material with intrinsic overcharge protection based on a 2,5-di-tert-butyl- 1,4-dimethoxybenzene core structure

Wei Weng, Zhengcheng Zhang, Ali Abouimrane, Paul C. Redfern, Larry A. Curtiss, Khalil Amine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polymer-based electroactive materials have been studied and applied in energy storage systems as a valid replacement for transition metal oxides. As early as 1999, Hass et al. proposed an interesting concept on the possible incorporation of both charge storage and overcharge protection functionality into a single material. However, there are virtually no examples of polymeric materials that can not only store the charge, but also consume the overcharge current. Herein, a new material based on a cross-linked polymer (I) with 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene as the core structure is reported. The cyclic voltammogram of the synthesized polymer shows a single oxidation/reduction peak at 3.9-4.0 V. At 1C rate (56 mA/g), polymer I shows stable cycling up to 200 cycles with <10% capacity loss. The redox shuttle mechanism remarkably can be activated when cell voltage is elevated to 4.3 V and the overcharge plateau at 4.2 V (2 nd plateau) is persistent for more than 100 hours. The overcharge protection was due to the release of a chemical redox shuttle species in the electrolyte during the initial charging process. Both DFT calculations and NMR analysis of the aromatic signals in the 1H-NMR spectrum of electrolytes from "overcharged" cells provide evidence for this hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4485-4492
Number of pages8
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume22
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Polymers
Cathodes
cathodes
polymers
Electrolytes
plateaus
Nuclear magnetic resonance
electrolytes
nuclear magnetic resonance
cycles
energy storage
cells
Discrete Fourier transforms
Energy storage
Oxides
Transition metals
metal oxides
charging
transition metals
oxidation

Keywords

  • DFT calculation
  • overcharge protection
  • polymer battery
  • polymer cathode
  • redox shuttle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Electrochemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Smart polymeric cathode material with intrinsic overcharge protection based on a 2,5-di-tert-butyl- 1,4-dimethoxybenzene core structure. / Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Abouimrane, Ali; Redfern, Paul C.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 22, No. 21, 07.11.2012, p. 4485-4492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weng, Wei ; Zhang, Zhengcheng ; Abouimrane, Ali ; Redfern, Paul C. ; Curtiss, Larry A. ; Amine, Khalil. / Smart polymeric cathode material with intrinsic overcharge protection based on a 2,5-di-tert-butyl- 1,4-dimethoxybenzene core structure. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 21. pp. 4485-4492.
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