Sleep and physical functioning in family caregivers of older adults with memory impairment

Adam P. Spira, Leah Friedman, Sherry A. Beaudreau, Sonia Ancoli-Israel, Beatriz Hernandez, Javaid Sheikh, Jerome Yesavage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sleep disturbance is common in caregivers of older adults with memory disorders. Little is known, however, about the implications of caregivers poor sleep with regard to their physical functioning. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between objectively measured sleep and self-reported physical functioning in 45 caregivers (mean age = 68.6 years) who completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36, and the Mini-mental State Examination, and wore an actigraph for at least three days. Our primary predictors were actigraphic sleep parameters, and our outcome was the SF-36 Physical Functioning subscale. Results: In multivariate-adjusted linear regression analyses, each 30-minute increase in caregivers total sleep time was associated with a 2.2-point improvement in their Physical Functioning subscale scores (unstandardized regression coefficient (B) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-3.4, p = 0.001). In addition, each 10-minute increase in time awake after initial sleep onset was associated with a 0.5-point decrease on the Physical Functioning subscale, although this was not statistically significant (B = 0.5, 95% CI 1.1, 0.1, p = 0.09). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that shorter sleep duration is associated with worse self-reported physical functioning in caregivers. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether poor sleep predicts functional decline in caregivers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)306-311
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Sleep
Confidence Intervals
Memory Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Depression
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Burden
  • Dementia
  • Insomnia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Spira, A. P., Friedman, L., Beaudreau, S. A., Ancoli-Israel, S., Hernandez, B., Sheikh, J., & Yesavage, J. (2010). Sleep and physical functioning in family caregivers of older adults with memory impairment. International Psychogeriatrics, 22(2), 306-311. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1041610209991153

Sleep and physical functioning in family caregivers of older adults with memory impairment. / Spira, Adam P.; Friedman, Leah; Beaudreau, Sherry A.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Hernandez, Beatriz; Sheikh, Javaid; Yesavage, Jerome.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 22, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 306-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spira, AP, Friedman, L, Beaudreau, SA, Ancoli-Israel, S, Hernandez, B, Sheikh, J & Yesavage, J 2010, 'Sleep and physical functioning in family caregivers of older adults with memory impairment', International Psychogeriatrics, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 306-311. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1041610209991153
Spira, Adam P. ; Friedman, Leah ; Beaudreau, Sherry A. ; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia ; Hernandez, Beatriz ; Sheikh, Javaid ; Yesavage, Jerome. / Sleep and physical functioning in family caregivers of older adults with memory impairment. In: International Psychogeriatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 306-311.
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