Skipping current affairs

The non-users of online and offline news

Damian Trilling, Klaus Schoenbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an information-rich environment with ample choice, do citizens still get exposed to what is going on around them in society? Or do they become 'information hermits', only interested in their personal hobbies? In contrast to widespread fears, the results of a large-scale survey, representative for the population of the Netherlands, suggest that most citizens still get an overview of what is going on in the world, and that television news is still the most popular source for that information. In addition, news on the Internet reaches those who are unlikely to seek news offline and wish to be entertained instead of informed. In detail, the study examines (1) which factors influence total news-overview avoidance, but also (2) what determines the amount of news exposure for those who do not skip the news.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-51
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Journal of Communication
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

current affairs
Television
news
Internet
citizen
recreational activity
News
television
Netherlands
anxiety

Keywords

  • Fragmentation
  • news
  • news avoidance
  • news exposure
  • online
  • selective exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

Skipping current affairs : The non-users of online and offline news. / Trilling, Damian; Schoenbach, Klaus.

In: European Journal of Communication, Vol. 28, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 35-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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