Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea

Santosh K. Yadav, Rajesh Kumar, Paul M. Macey, Heidi L. Richardson, Danny J.J. Wang, Mary A. Woo, Ronald M. Harper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition characterized by upper airway muscle atonia with continued diaphragmatic efforts, resulting in repeated airway obstructions, periods of intermittent hypoxia, large thoracic pressure changes, and substantial shifts in arterial pressure with breathing cessation and resumption. The hypoxic exposure and hemodynamic changes likely induce the structural and functional deficits found in multiple brain areas, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to these localized deficits; thus, we examined regional CBF, using arterial spin labeling procedures, in 11 OSA (age, 49.1. ±. 12.2 years; 7 male) and 16 control subjects (42.3. ±. 10.2 years; 6 male) with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. CBF maps were calculated, normalized to a common space, and regional CBF values across the brain quantified. Lowered CBF values emerged near multiple bilateral brain sites in OSA, including the corticospinal tracts, superior cerebellar peduncles, and pontocerebellar fibers. Lateralized, decreased CBF appeared near the left inferior cerebellar peduncles, left tapetum, left dorsal fornix/stria terminalis, right medial lemniscus, right red nucleus, right midbrain, and midline pons. Regional CBF values in OSA are significantly reduced in major sensory and motor fiber systems and motor regulatory sites, especially in structures mediating motor coordination; those reductions are often lateralized. The asymmetric CBF declines in motor regulatory areas may contribute to loss of coordination between upper airway and diaphragmatic musculature, and lead to further damage in the syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume555
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Regional Blood Flow
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Red Nucleus
Pyramidal Tracts
Pons
Motor Cortex
Airway Obstruction
Mesencephalon
Arterial Pressure
Respiration
Thorax
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Arterial spin labeling
  • Cerebral hemodynamics
  • Hypoxemia
  • Motor coordination
  • Sensory control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Yadav, S. K., Kumar, R., Macey, P. M., Richardson, H. L., Wang, D. J. J., Woo, M. A., & Harper, R. M. (2013). Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea. Neuroscience Letters, 555, 159-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2013.09.033

Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea. / Yadav, Santosh K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Richardson, Heidi L.; Wang, Danny J.J.; Woo, Mary A.; Harper, Ronald M.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 555, 25.10.2013, p. 159-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yadav, SK, Kumar, R, Macey, PM, Richardson, HL, Wang, DJJ, Woo, MA & Harper, RM 2013, 'Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea', Neuroscience Letters, vol. 555, pp. 159-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2013.09.033
Yadav, Santosh K. ; Kumar, Rajesh ; Macey, Paul M. ; Richardson, Heidi L. ; Wang, Danny J.J. ; Woo, Mary A. ; Harper, Ronald M. / Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea. In: Neuroscience Letters. 2013 ; Vol. 555. pp. 159-164.
@article{f18de4e0dc334d02b45ad841c3d75923,
title = "Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea",
abstract = "Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition characterized by upper airway muscle atonia with continued diaphragmatic efforts, resulting in repeated airway obstructions, periods of intermittent hypoxia, large thoracic pressure changes, and substantial shifts in arterial pressure with breathing cessation and resumption. The hypoxic exposure and hemodynamic changes likely induce the structural and functional deficits found in multiple brain areas, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to these localized deficits; thus, we examined regional CBF, using arterial spin labeling procedures, in 11 OSA (age, 49.1. ±. 12.2 years; 7 male) and 16 control subjects (42.3. ±. 10.2 years; 6 male) with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. CBF maps were calculated, normalized to a common space, and regional CBF values across the brain quantified. Lowered CBF values emerged near multiple bilateral brain sites in OSA, including the corticospinal tracts, superior cerebellar peduncles, and pontocerebellar fibers. Lateralized, decreased CBF appeared near the left inferior cerebellar peduncles, left tapetum, left dorsal fornix/stria terminalis, right medial lemniscus, right red nucleus, right midbrain, and midline pons. Regional CBF values in OSA are significantly reduced in major sensory and motor fiber systems and motor regulatory sites, especially in structures mediating motor coordination; those reductions are often lateralized. The asymmetric CBF declines in motor regulatory areas may contribute to loss of coordination between upper airway and diaphragmatic musculature, and lead to further damage in the syndrome.",
keywords = "Arterial spin labeling, Cerebral hemodynamics, Hypoxemia, Motor coordination, Sensory control",
author = "Yadav, {Santosh K.} and Rajesh Kumar and Macey, {Paul M.} and Richardson, {Heidi L.} and Wang, {Danny J.J.} and Woo, {Mary A.} and Harper, {Ronald M.}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1016/j.neulet.2013.09.033",
language = "English",
volume = "555",
pages = "159--164",
journal = "Neuroscience Letters",
issn = "0304-3940",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Regional cerebral blood flow alterations in obstructive sleep apnea

AU - Yadav, Santosh K.

AU - Kumar, Rajesh

AU - Macey, Paul M.

AU - Richardson, Heidi L.

AU - Wang, Danny J.J.

AU - Woo, Mary A.

AU - Harper, Ronald M.

PY - 2013/10/25

Y1 - 2013/10/25

N2 - Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition characterized by upper airway muscle atonia with continued diaphragmatic efforts, resulting in repeated airway obstructions, periods of intermittent hypoxia, large thoracic pressure changes, and substantial shifts in arterial pressure with breathing cessation and resumption. The hypoxic exposure and hemodynamic changes likely induce the structural and functional deficits found in multiple brain areas, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to these localized deficits; thus, we examined regional CBF, using arterial spin labeling procedures, in 11 OSA (age, 49.1. ±. 12.2 years; 7 male) and 16 control subjects (42.3. ±. 10.2 years; 6 male) with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. CBF maps were calculated, normalized to a common space, and regional CBF values across the brain quantified. Lowered CBF values emerged near multiple bilateral brain sites in OSA, including the corticospinal tracts, superior cerebellar peduncles, and pontocerebellar fibers. Lateralized, decreased CBF appeared near the left inferior cerebellar peduncles, left tapetum, left dorsal fornix/stria terminalis, right medial lemniscus, right red nucleus, right midbrain, and midline pons. Regional CBF values in OSA are significantly reduced in major sensory and motor fiber systems and motor regulatory sites, especially in structures mediating motor coordination; those reductions are often lateralized. The asymmetric CBF declines in motor regulatory areas may contribute to loss of coordination between upper airway and diaphragmatic musculature, and lead to further damage in the syndrome.

AB - Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition characterized by upper airway muscle atonia with continued diaphragmatic efforts, resulting in repeated airway obstructions, periods of intermittent hypoxia, large thoracic pressure changes, and substantial shifts in arterial pressure with breathing cessation and resumption. The hypoxic exposure and hemodynamic changes likely induce the structural and functional deficits found in multiple brain areas, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. Altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to these localized deficits; thus, we examined regional CBF, using arterial spin labeling procedures, in 11 OSA (age, 49.1. ±. 12.2 years; 7 male) and 16 control subjects (42.3. ±. 10.2 years; 6 male) with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. CBF maps were calculated, normalized to a common space, and regional CBF values across the brain quantified. Lowered CBF values emerged near multiple bilateral brain sites in OSA, including the corticospinal tracts, superior cerebellar peduncles, and pontocerebellar fibers. Lateralized, decreased CBF appeared near the left inferior cerebellar peduncles, left tapetum, left dorsal fornix/stria terminalis, right medial lemniscus, right red nucleus, right midbrain, and midline pons. Regional CBF values in OSA are significantly reduced in major sensory and motor fiber systems and motor regulatory sites, especially in structures mediating motor coordination; those reductions are often lateralized. The asymmetric CBF declines in motor regulatory areas may contribute to loss of coordination between upper airway and diaphragmatic musculature, and lead to further damage in the syndrome.

KW - Arterial spin labeling

KW - Cerebral hemodynamics

KW - Hypoxemia

KW - Motor coordination

KW - Sensory control

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885830325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84885830325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neulet.2013.09.033

DO - 10.1016/j.neulet.2013.09.033

M3 - Article

VL - 555

SP - 159

EP - 164

JO - Neuroscience Letters

JF - Neuroscience Letters

SN - 0304-3940

ER -