Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests aStrategy of Immune Evasion

Alexis Boyd, Sasisekhar Bennuru, Yuanyuan Wang, Vivornpun Sanprasert, Melissa Law, Damien J. Chaussabel, Thomas B. Nutman, Roshanak Tolouei Semnani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitroand exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression ofthe proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-α), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1γ, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result inaltered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters thatwere exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1420-1429
Number of pages10
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume81
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immune Evasion
Langerhans Cells
Parasites
Interleukin-1
Interleukin-18
Cadherins
Blister
Coculture Techniques
Keratinocytes
Interleukin-6
Toll-Like Receptor 3
Cytokines
Caspase 1
Skin
Toxoplasma
HLA-DR Antigens
Culicidae
Interleukin-8
Epidermis
Interleukin-10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests aStrategy of Immune Evasion. / Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien J.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 81, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 1420-1429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boyd, Alexis ; Bennuru, Sasisekhar ; Wang, Yuanyuan ; Sanprasert, Vivornpun ; Law, Melissa ; Chaussabel, Damien J. ; Nutman, Thomas B. ; Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei. / Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests aStrategy of Immune Evasion. In: Infection and Immunity. 2013 ; Vol. 81, No. 5. pp. 1420-1429.
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AU - Sanprasert, Vivornpun

AU - Law, Melissa

AU - Chaussabel, Damien J.

AU - Nutman, Thomas B.

AU - Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei

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