Purification, functionalization, and bioconjugation of carbon nanotubes.

John H T Luong, Keith B. Male, Khaled Mahmoud, Fwu Shan Sheu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioconjugation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with biomolecules promises exciting applications such as biosensing, nanobiocomposite formulation, design of drug vector systems, and probing protein interactions. Pristine CNTs, however, are virtually water-insoluble and difficult to evenly disperse in a liquid matrix. Therefore, it is necessary to attach molecules or functional groups to their sidewalls to enable bioconjugation. Both noncovalent and covalent procedures can be used to conjugate CNTs with a target biomolecule for a specific bioapplication. This chapter presents a few selected protocols that can be performed at any wet chemistry laboratory to purify and biofunctionalize CNTs. The preparation of CNTs modified with metallic nanoparticles, especially gold, is also described since biomolecules can bind and self-organize on the surfaces of such metal-decorated CNTs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-532
Number of pages28
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume751
Publication statusPublished - 4 Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Metal Nanoparticles
Drug Compounding
Drug Design
Gold
Metals
Water
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Purification, functionalization, and bioconjugation of carbon nanotubes. / Luong, John H T; Male, Keith B.; Mahmoud, Khaled; Sheu, Fwu Shan.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 751, 04.10.2011, p. 505-532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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