Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar: Results from a National Health Survey

Mohamed Hamad Al-Thani, Al Anoud Mohammed Al-Thani, Sohaila Cheema, Javaid Sheikh, Ravinder Mamtani, Albert B. Lowenfels, Walaa Fattah Al-Chetachi, Badria Ali Almalki, Shamseldin Ali Hassan Khalifa, Ahmad Omar Haj Bakri, Patrick Maisonneuve

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: To determine optimum measurements for abdominal obesity and to assess the prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Design: National health survey. Setting: Qatar National STEPwise Survey conducted by the Supreme Council of Health during 2012. Participants: 2496 Qatari citizens aged 1864 representative of the general population. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Measure of obesity (body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-height ratio) that best identified the presence of at least 2 other factors of metabolic syndrome; cut-off values of waist circumference; frequency of metabolic syndrome. Results: Waist circumference ≥102 for men and ≥94 cm for women was the best predictor of the presence of other determinants of metabolic syndrome (raised blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). Using these values, we identified 28% of Qataris with metabolic syndrome, which is considerably lower than the estimate of 37% calculated using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Restricting the analysis to participants without known elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar or diabetes 16.5% would be classified as having metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased steadily with age (OR=3.40 (95% CI 2.02 to 5.74), OR=5.66 (3.65 to 8.78), OR=10.2 (5.98 to 17.6) and OR=18.2 (7.01 to 47.5) for those in the age group 3039', 4049', 5059', 6064' vs 1829'; p<0.0001), decreased with increasing educational attainment (OR=0.61 (0.39 to 0.96) for those who attained secondary school or more' compared with less than primary school'; p=0.03) and exercise (OR=0.60 (0.42 to 0.86) for those exercising ≥3000 vs <600 MET-min/week; p=0.006) but was not associated with smoking or diet. Conclusions: Waist circumference was the best measure of obesity to combine with other variables to construct a country-specific definition of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Approximately 28% of adult Qatari citizens satisfy the criteria for metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere009514
JournalBMJ Open
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

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Qatar
Health Surveys
Waist Circumference
Blood Glucose
Obesity
Blood Pressure
Abdominal Obesity
HDL Cholesterol
Fasting
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Exercise
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Al-Thani, M. H., Al-Thani, A. A. M., Cheema, S., Sheikh, J., Mamtani, R., Lowenfels, A. B., ... Maisonneuve, P. (2016). Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar: Results from a National Health Survey. BMJ Open, 6(9), [e009514]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009514

Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar : Results from a National Health Survey. / Al-Thani, Mohamed Hamad; Al-Thani, Al Anoud Mohammed; Cheema, Sohaila; Sheikh, Javaid; Mamtani, Ravinder; Lowenfels, Albert B.; Al-Chetachi, Walaa Fattah; Almalki, Badria Ali; Khalifa, Shamseldin Ali Hassan; Bakri, Ahmad Omar Haj; Maisonneuve, Patrick.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 6, No. 9, e009514, 01.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Thani, MH, Al-Thani, AAM, Cheema, S, Sheikh, J, Mamtani, R, Lowenfels, AB, Al-Chetachi, WF, Almalki, BA, Khalifa, SAH, Bakri, AOH & Maisonneuve, P 2016, 'Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar: Results from a National Health Survey', BMJ Open, vol. 6, no. 9, e009514. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009514
Al-Thani, Mohamed Hamad ; Al-Thani, Al Anoud Mohammed ; Cheema, Sohaila ; Sheikh, Javaid ; Mamtani, Ravinder ; Lowenfels, Albert B. ; Al-Chetachi, Walaa Fattah ; Almalki, Badria Ali ; Khalifa, Shamseldin Ali Hassan ; Bakri, Ahmad Omar Haj ; Maisonneuve, Patrick. / Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar : Results from a National Health Survey. In: BMJ Open. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 9.
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AU - Sheikh, Javaid

AU - Mamtani, Ravinder

AU - Lowenfels, Albert B.

AU - Al-Chetachi, Walaa Fattah

AU - Almalki, Badria Ali

AU - Khalifa, Shamseldin Ali Hassan

AU - Bakri, Ahmad Omar Haj

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N2 - Objectives: To determine optimum measurements for abdominal obesity and to assess the prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Design: National health survey. Setting: Qatar National STEPwise Survey conducted by the Supreme Council of Health during 2012. Participants: 2496 Qatari citizens aged 1864 representative of the general population. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Measure of obesity (body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-height ratio) that best identified the presence of at least 2 other factors of metabolic syndrome; cut-off values of waist circumference; frequency of metabolic syndrome. Results: Waist circumference ≥102 for men and ≥94 cm for women was the best predictor of the presence of other determinants of metabolic syndrome (raised blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). Using these values, we identified 28% of Qataris with metabolic syndrome, which is considerably lower than the estimate of 37% calculated using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Restricting the analysis to participants without known elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar or diabetes 16.5% would be classified as having metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased steadily with age (OR=3.40 (95% CI 2.02 to 5.74), OR=5.66 (3.65 to 8.78), OR=10.2 (5.98 to 17.6) and OR=18.2 (7.01 to 47.5) for those in the age group 3039', 4049', 5059', 6064' vs 1829'; p<0.0001), decreased with increasing educational attainment (OR=0.61 (0.39 to 0.96) for those who attained secondary school or more' compared with less than primary school'; p=0.03) and exercise (OR=0.60 (0.42 to 0.86) for those exercising ≥3000 vs <600 MET-min/week; p=0.006) but was not associated with smoking or diet. Conclusions: Waist circumference was the best measure of obesity to combine with other variables to construct a country-specific definition of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Approximately 28% of adult Qatari citizens satisfy the criteria for metabolic syndrome.

AB - Objectives: To determine optimum measurements for abdominal obesity and to assess the prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Design: National health survey. Setting: Qatar National STEPwise Survey conducted by the Supreme Council of Health during 2012. Participants: 2496 Qatari citizens aged 1864 representative of the general population. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Measure of obesity (body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-height ratio) that best identified the presence of at least 2 other factors of metabolic syndrome; cut-off values of waist circumference; frequency of metabolic syndrome. Results: Waist circumference ≥102 for men and ≥94 cm for women was the best predictor of the presence of other determinants of metabolic syndrome (raised blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). Using these values, we identified 28% of Qataris with metabolic syndrome, which is considerably lower than the estimate of 37% calculated using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Restricting the analysis to participants without known elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar or diabetes 16.5% would be classified as having metabolic syndrome. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased steadily with age (OR=3.40 (95% CI 2.02 to 5.74), OR=5.66 (3.65 to 8.78), OR=10.2 (5.98 to 17.6) and OR=18.2 (7.01 to 47.5) for those in the age group 3039', 4049', 5059', 6064' vs 1829'; p<0.0001), decreased with increasing educational attainment (OR=0.61 (0.39 to 0.96) for those who attained secondary school or more' compared with less than primary school'; p=0.03) and exercise (OR=0.60 (0.42 to 0.86) for those exercising ≥3000 vs <600 MET-min/week; p=0.006) but was not associated with smoking or diet. Conclusions: Waist circumference was the best measure of obesity to combine with other variables to construct a country-specific definition of metabolic syndrome in Qatar. Approximately 28% of adult Qatari citizens satisfy the criteria for metabolic syndrome.

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