Pre-intervention assessment for disruptive behavior problems

A focus on staff needs

Erin L. Cassidy, Javaid Sheikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental health professionals are often called upon to assist institutions in their struggle to manage the behavior problems associated with dementia. The current article provides an example of a typical behavioral consultation. The various methods of assessment, including topographical, functional and observational are described in the context of planning future interventions. Results indicate that a large proportion of staff time, approximately 40%, is spent implementing such interventions. Although the time required is great, frontline staff are adept at utilizing less invasive interventions first. Implications for subsequent interventions, need for continued evaluation and reassessing levels of staff burden are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-171
Number of pages6
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dementia
Mental Health
Referral and Consultation
Problem Behavior
icodextrin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Pre-intervention assessment for disruptive behavior problems : A focus on staff needs. / Cassidy, Erin L.; Sheikh, Javaid.

In: Aging and Mental Health, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2002, p. 166-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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