Potential health impacts of consuming desalinated bottled water

Candace Rowell, Nora Kuiper, Basem Shomar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared physicochemical properties, anion and carbon content and major and trace elements in desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water available in Qatar, and assessed the potential health risks associated with prolonged consumption of desalinated water. Results indicate that Qatar's population is not at elevated risk of dietary exposure to As (mean = 666 ng/L), Ba (48.0 μg/L), Be (9.27 ng/L), Cd (20.1 ng/L), Cr (874 ng/L), Pb (258 ng/L), Sb (475 ng/L) and U (533 ng/L) from consumption of both desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water types available in the country. Consumers who primarily consume desalinated water brands further minimize risk of exposure to heavy metals as levels were significantly lower than in non-desalinated bottled water. Desalinated bottled water was not a significant contributor to recommended daily intakes for Ca, Mg and F- for adults and children and may increase risk of deficiencies. Desalinated bottled water accounted for only 3% of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) adequate intake (AI) for Ca, 5-6% of the recommended daily allowance for Mg and 4% of the AI for F among adults. For children desalinated water contributed 2-3% of the IOM AI<inf>Ca</inf>, 3-10% of the RDA<inf>Mg</inf> and 3-9% of the AI<inf>F</inf>.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-445
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Water and Health
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

health impact
Drinking Water
Qatar
Health
Recommended Dietary Allowances
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
water
medicine
Water
Trace Elements
Heavy Metals
Drinking
Anions
Carbon
physicochemical property
health risk
anion
Population
trace element
heavy metal

Keywords

  • Bottled water
  • Ca
  • Desalination
  • F
  • Mg
  • Trace elements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Potential health impacts of consuming desalinated bottled water. / Rowell, Candace; Kuiper, Nora; Shomar, Basem.

In: Journal of Water and Health, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2015, p. 437-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rowell, Candace ; Kuiper, Nora ; Shomar, Basem. / Potential health impacts of consuming desalinated bottled water. In: Journal of Water and Health. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 437-445.
@article{750a62cf98fd48b1956e8e20733c6183,
title = "Potential health impacts of consuming desalinated bottled water",
abstract = "This study compared physicochemical properties, anion and carbon content and major and trace elements in desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water available in Qatar, and assessed the potential health risks associated with prolonged consumption of desalinated water. Results indicate that Qatar's population is not at elevated risk of dietary exposure to As (mean = 666 ng/L), Ba (48.0 μg/L), Be (9.27 ng/L), Cd (20.1 ng/L), Cr (874 ng/L), Pb (258 ng/L), Sb (475 ng/L) and U (533 ng/L) from consumption of both desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water types available in the country. Consumers who primarily consume desalinated water brands further minimize risk of exposure to heavy metals as levels were significantly lower than in non-desalinated bottled water. Desalinated bottled water was not a significant contributor to recommended daily intakes for Ca, Mg and F- for adults and children and may increase risk of deficiencies. Desalinated bottled water accounted for only 3{\%} of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) adequate intake (AI) for Ca, 5-6{\%} of the recommended daily allowance for Mg and 4{\%} of the AI for F among adults. For children desalinated water contributed 2-3{\%} of the IOM AICa, 3-10{\%} of the RDAMg and 3-9{\%} of the AIF.",
keywords = "Bottled water, Ca, Desalination, F, Mg, Trace elements",
author = "Candace Rowell and Nora Kuiper and Basem Shomar",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.2166/wh.2014.128",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "437--445",
journal = "Journal of Water and Health",
issn = "1477-8920",
publisher = "IWA Publishing",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential health impacts of consuming desalinated bottled water

AU - Rowell, Candace

AU - Kuiper, Nora

AU - Shomar, Basem

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This study compared physicochemical properties, anion and carbon content and major and trace elements in desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water available in Qatar, and assessed the potential health risks associated with prolonged consumption of desalinated water. Results indicate that Qatar's population is not at elevated risk of dietary exposure to As (mean = 666 ng/L), Ba (48.0 μg/L), Be (9.27 ng/L), Cd (20.1 ng/L), Cr (874 ng/L), Pb (258 ng/L), Sb (475 ng/L) and U (533 ng/L) from consumption of both desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water types available in the country. Consumers who primarily consume desalinated water brands further minimize risk of exposure to heavy metals as levels were significantly lower than in non-desalinated bottled water. Desalinated bottled water was not a significant contributor to recommended daily intakes for Ca, Mg and F- for adults and children and may increase risk of deficiencies. Desalinated bottled water accounted for only 3% of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) adequate intake (AI) for Ca, 5-6% of the recommended daily allowance for Mg and 4% of the AI for F among adults. For children desalinated water contributed 2-3% of the IOM AICa, 3-10% of the RDAMg and 3-9% of the AIF.

AB - This study compared physicochemical properties, anion and carbon content and major and trace elements in desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water available in Qatar, and assessed the potential health risks associated with prolonged consumption of desalinated water. Results indicate that Qatar's population is not at elevated risk of dietary exposure to As (mean = 666 ng/L), Ba (48.0 μg/L), Be (9.27 ng/L), Cd (20.1 ng/L), Cr (874 ng/L), Pb (258 ng/L), Sb (475 ng/L) and U (533 ng/L) from consumption of both desalinated and non-desalinated bottled water types available in the country. Consumers who primarily consume desalinated water brands further minimize risk of exposure to heavy metals as levels were significantly lower than in non-desalinated bottled water. Desalinated bottled water was not a significant contributor to recommended daily intakes for Ca, Mg and F- for adults and children and may increase risk of deficiencies. Desalinated bottled water accounted for only 3% of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) adequate intake (AI) for Ca, 5-6% of the recommended daily allowance for Mg and 4% of the AI for F among adults. For children desalinated water contributed 2-3% of the IOM AICa, 3-10% of the RDAMg and 3-9% of the AIF.

KW - Bottled water

KW - Ca

KW - Desalination

KW - F

KW - Mg

KW - Trace elements

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930585500&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930585500&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2166/wh.2014.128

DO - 10.2166/wh.2014.128

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 437

EP - 445

JO - Journal of Water and Health

JF - Journal of Water and Health

SN - 1477-8920

IS - 2

ER -