Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah

Roger R. Williams, Paul N. Hopkins, Steven Hunt, Lily L. Wu, Sandra J. Hasstedt, Jean Marc Lalouel, K. Owen Ash, Barry M. Stults, Hiroshi Kuida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The frequency of familial dyslipidemia syndromes was determined from blood tests in 33 objectively ascertained families with early coronary heart disease (CHO) (two or more siblings with CHD by the age of 55 years). Three fourths of persons with early CHD in these families had 90th percentile lipid abnormalities (cholesterol level at or above the 90th percentile, triglyceride level at or above the 90th percentile, and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level at or less than the 10th percentile). The HDL-C and triglyceride abnormalities were twice as common as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol abnormalities. The most common syndromes found were familial combined hyperlipidemia (36% to 48% of families with CHD), familial dyslipidemic hypertension (21 % to 54% of families with CHD), and isolated low levels of HDL-C (15%), with overlapping familial dyslipidemic hypertension with familial combined hyperlipidemia and low-level HDL-C. Well-defined monogenic syndromes were uncommon: familial hypercholesterolemia being 3% and familial type III hyperlipidemia, 3%. Another 15% of families with CHD had no lipid abnormalities at the 90th percentile. Physicians should learn to recognize and treat these common familial syndromes before the onset of CHD by evaluating family history and all three standard blood lipid determinations. Failure to recognize and treat them leaves affected family members at high risk of premature CHD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)582-588
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume150
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dyslipidemias
Population
Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia
HDL Cholesterol
Lipids
Hypertension
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II
Hematologic Tests
Hyperlipidemias
LDL Cholesterol
Coronary Disease
Siblings
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Williams, R. R., Hopkins, P. N., Hunt, S., Wu, L. L., Hasstedt, S. J., Lalouel, J. M., ... Kuida, H. (1990). Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah. Archives of Internal Medicine, 150(3), 582-588.

Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah. / Williams, Roger R.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Hunt, Steven; Wu, Lily L.; Hasstedt, Sandra J.; Lalouel, Jean Marc; Ash, K. Owen; Stults, Barry M.; Kuida, Hiroshi.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 150, No. 3, 03.1990, p. 582-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, RR, Hopkins, PN, Hunt, S, Wu, LL, Hasstedt, SJ, Lalouel, JM, Ash, KO, Stults, BM & Kuida, H 1990, 'Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 150, no. 3, pp. 582-588.
Williams RR, Hopkins PN, Hunt S, Wu LL, Hasstedt SJ, Lalouel JM et al. Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah. Archives of Internal Medicine. 1990 Mar;150(3):582-588.
Williams, Roger R. ; Hopkins, Paul N. ; Hunt, Steven ; Wu, Lily L. ; Hasstedt, Sandra J. ; Lalouel, Jean Marc ; Ash, K. Owen ; Stults, Barry M. ; Kuida, Hiroshi. / Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 150, No. 3. pp. 582-588.
@article{0c6bfaa5de214a328b7601c28149a01f,
title = "Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah",
abstract = "The frequency of familial dyslipidemia syndromes was determined from blood tests in 33 objectively ascertained families with early coronary heart disease (CHO) (two or more siblings with CHD by the age of 55 years). Three fourths of persons with early CHD in these families had 90th percentile lipid abnormalities (cholesterol level at or above the 90th percentile, triglyceride level at or above the 90th percentile, and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level at or less than the 10th percentile). The HDL-C and triglyceride abnormalities were twice as common as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol abnormalities. The most common syndromes found were familial combined hyperlipidemia (36{\%} to 48{\%} of families with CHD), familial dyslipidemic hypertension (21 {\%} to 54{\%} of families with CHD), and isolated low levels of HDL-C (15{\%}), with overlapping familial dyslipidemic hypertension with familial combined hyperlipidemia and low-level HDL-C. Well-defined monogenic syndromes were uncommon: familial hypercholesterolemia being 3{\%} and familial type III hyperlipidemia, 3{\%}. Another 15{\%} of families with CHD had no lipid abnormalities at the 90th percentile. Physicians should learn to recognize and treat these common familial syndromes before the onset of CHD by evaluating family history and all three standard blood lipid determinations. Failure to recognize and treat them leaves affected family members at high risk of premature CHD.",
author = "Williams, {Roger R.} and Hopkins, {Paul N.} and Steven Hunt and Wu, {Lily L.} and Hasstedt, {Sandra J.} and Lalouel, {Jean Marc} and Ash, {K. Owen} and Stults, {Barry M.} and Hiroshi Kuida",
year = "1990",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "150",
pages = "582--588",
journal = "JAMA Internal Medicine",
issn = "2168-6106",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Population-based frequency of dyslipidemia syndromes in coronary-prone families in Utah

AU - Williams, Roger R.

AU - Hopkins, Paul N.

AU - Hunt, Steven

AU - Wu, Lily L.

AU - Hasstedt, Sandra J.

AU - Lalouel, Jean Marc

AU - Ash, K. Owen

AU - Stults, Barry M.

AU - Kuida, Hiroshi

PY - 1990/3

Y1 - 1990/3

N2 - The frequency of familial dyslipidemia syndromes was determined from blood tests in 33 objectively ascertained families with early coronary heart disease (CHO) (two or more siblings with CHD by the age of 55 years). Three fourths of persons with early CHD in these families had 90th percentile lipid abnormalities (cholesterol level at or above the 90th percentile, triglyceride level at or above the 90th percentile, and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level at or less than the 10th percentile). The HDL-C and triglyceride abnormalities were twice as common as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol abnormalities. The most common syndromes found were familial combined hyperlipidemia (36% to 48% of families with CHD), familial dyslipidemic hypertension (21 % to 54% of families with CHD), and isolated low levels of HDL-C (15%), with overlapping familial dyslipidemic hypertension with familial combined hyperlipidemia and low-level HDL-C. Well-defined monogenic syndromes were uncommon: familial hypercholesterolemia being 3% and familial type III hyperlipidemia, 3%. Another 15% of families with CHD had no lipid abnormalities at the 90th percentile. Physicians should learn to recognize and treat these common familial syndromes before the onset of CHD by evaluating family history and all three standard blood lipid determinations. Failure to recognize and treat them leaves affected family members at high risk of premature CHD.

AB - The frequency of familial dyslipidemia syndromes was determined from blood tests in 33 objectively ascertained families with early coronary heart disease (CHO) (two or more siblings with CHD by the age of 55 years). Three fourths of persons with early CHD in these families had 90th percentile lipid abnormalities (cholesterol level at or above the 90th percentile, triglyceride level at or above the 90th percentile, and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level at or less than the 10th percentile). The HDL-C and triglyceride abnormalities were twice as common as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol abnormalities. The most common syndromes found were familial combined hyperlipidemia (36% to 48% of families with CHD), familial dyslipidemic hypertension (21 % to 54% of families with CHD), and isolated low levels of HDL-C (15%), with overlapping familial dyslipidemic hypertension with familial combined hyperlipidemia and low-level HDL-C. Well-defined monogenic syndromes were uncommon: familial hypercholesterolemia being 3% and familial type III hyperlipidemia, 3%. Another 15% of families with CHD had no lipid abnormalities at the 90th percentile. Physicians should learn to recognize and treat these common familial syndromes before the onset of CHD by evaluating family history and all three standard blood lipid determinations. Failure to recognize and treat them leaves affected family members at high risk of premature CHD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025266196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025266196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 150

SP - 582

EP - 588

JO - JAMA Internal Medicine

JF - JAMA Internal Medicine

SN - 2168-6106

IS - 3

ER -