Politicians on TV news: Getting attention in Dutch and German election campaigns

Klaus Schoenbach, Jan De Ridder, Edmund Lauf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Different strategies apply in the Netherlands and in Germany when TV channels have to decide how often politicians are mentioned or shown in the news during national election campaigns. Extensive content analyses in the 1990s suggest that Dutch political and media traditions promote a more equally distributed attention to different political positions. In Germany, TV news focuses almost exclusively on the incumbent candidate for the top function of the national government (the office of Chancellor) and his challengers. The likely causes are not only the political system and the particular circumstances of the 1990s (with the pre-eminence of Helmut Kohl), but also recent developments in the way in which German journalists define their task.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519-531
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Journal of Political Research
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2001
Externally publishedYes

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election campaign
politician
news
journalist
political system
Netherlands
candidacy
cause

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Politicians on TV news : Getting attention in Dutch and German election campaigns. / Schoenbach, Klaus; De Ridder, Jan; Lauf, Edmund.

In: European Journal of Political Research, Vol. 39, No. 4, 06.2001, p. 519-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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