Political speech in social media streams

YouTube comments and Twitter posts

Yelena Mejova, Padmini Srinivasan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, political sentiment on social media websites has been receiving much attention both in research circles and in the news. However, political sentiment analysis has been largely performed on only a single social media source. It is unclear what outcomes would result if more than one source were used. We present a unique comparison of the textual content of two popular social media - Twitter posts and YouTube comments - over a common set of queries which include politicians, issues, and events. We show Twitter as a stream driven by news and outside sources with 40% share of its content lacking any sentiment, and YouTube as an outlet for opinionated speech. Specifically in YouTube, we find that the author's political stance and the sentiment of the document do not always match, and should be treated separately in analysis of political documents. We also examine the connection between social media sentiment and that of general population by comparing our findings to the Gallup poll, and show that neither discussion volume or sentiment expressed in the two social media were able to predict the republican Presidential nominee frontrunner.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci'12
Pages205-208
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci 2012 - Evanston, IL, United States
Duration: 22 Jun 201224 Jun 2012

Other

Other3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci 2012
CountryUnited States
CityEvanston, IL
Period22/6/1224/6/12

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Websites

Keywords

  • Political discourse
  • Sentiment analysis
  • Social media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Mejova, Y., & Srinivasan, P. (2012). Political speech in social media streams: YouTube comments and Twitter posts. In Proceedings of the 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci'12 (pp. 205-208) https://doi.org/10.1145/2380718.2380744

Political speech in social media streams : YouTube comments and Twitter posts. / Mejova, Yelena; Srinivasan, Padmini.

Proceedings of the 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci'12. 2012. p. 205-208.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mejova, Y & Srinivasan, P 2012, Political speech in social media streams: YouTube comments and Twitter posts. in Proceedings of the 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci'12. pp. 205-208, 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci 2012, Evanston, IL, United States, 22/6/12. https://doi.org/10.1145/2380718.2380744
Mejova Y, Srinivasan P. Political speech in social media streams: YouTube comments and Twitter posts. In Proceedings of the 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci'12. 2012. p. 205-208 https://doi.org/10.1145/2380718.2380744
Mejova, Yelena ; Srinivasan, Padmini. / Political speech in social media streams : YouTube comments and Twitter posts. Proceedings of the 3rd Annual ACM Web Science Conference, WebSci'12. 2012. pp. 205-208
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