Playing with and without Biofeedback

M. Abdullah Zafar, Beena Ahmed, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Casual mobile games enhanced with biofeedback provide a more engaging alternative to traditional stress self-regulation therapies. Previous studies have shown to help players acquire breathing control skills that carry-over into a subsequent cognitively stressful task. We replicated these results with higher power (42 users), and with a more challenging game. We used a Pac-Man style game enhanced with Respiratory Biofeedback, Pac-Man Zen, to compare 1) breathing control during play, 2) the carry-over of said control into a subsequent stressful task and 3) cognitive improvement in a subsequent stressful task against a non-biofeedback version of the game. Results showed that one-time training with the biofeedback version of the game was not only more effective, but also led to improved performance in a later stressful task, both in terms of lowered breathing and improved test scores, compared to the non-biofeedback version. The result is important because it suggests that stimulating, casual biofeedback games can be effective at teaching breathing control, and thus arousal regulation, in a stressful setting.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781509054824
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jun 2017
Event5th IEEE International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017 - Perth, Australia
Duration: 2 Apr 20174 Apr 2017

Other

Other5th IEEE International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period2/4/174/4/17

Fingerprint

Biofeedback
Respiration
self-regulation
Arousal
Teaching
regulation
Biofeedback (Psychology)
performance

Keywords

  • biofeedback
  • game-based learning
  • mobile game
  • respiratory control
  • stress regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Media Technology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education

Cite this

Zafar, M. A., Ahmed, B., & Gutierrez-Osuna, R. (2017). Playing with and without Biofeedback. In 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017 [7939272] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/SeGAH.2017.7939272

Playing with and without Biofeedback. / Zafar, M. Abdullah; Ahmed, Beena; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo.

2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. 7939272.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Zafar, MA, Ahmed, B & Gutierrez-Osuna, R 2017, Playing with and without Biofeedback. in 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017., 7939272, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 5th IEEE International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017, Perth, Australia, 2/4/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/SeGAH.2017.7939272
Zafar MA, Ahmed B, Gutierrez-Osuna R. Playing with and without Biofeedback. In 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. 7939272 https://doi.org/10.1109/SeGAH.2017.7939272
Zafar, M. Abdullah ; Ahmed, Beena ; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo. / Playing with and without Biofeedback. 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017.
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