Plasma homocyst(e)ine as a risk factor for early familial coronary artery disease

Lily L. Wu, James Wu, Steven Hunt, Brent C. James, G. Michael Vincent, Roger R. Williams, Paul N. Hopkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We measured plasma homocyst(e)ine [H(e)] and other coronary risk factors in 266 patients with early coronary artery disease from 170 families in which two or more siblings were affected and in 168 unmatched controls. The mean H(e) concentration adjusted for significant correlates (serum creatinine, uric acid, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) was 12.0 μmol/L in proband cases compared with 10.1 μmol/L in controls (P = 0.0001). Many (17.6%) of the proband cases had H(e) concentrations exceeding the 95th percentile for the controls (relative odds = 4.9, P <0.001). H(e) among cases was bimodally distributed even after adjustment for concentrations of plasma vitamins. Concordant high H(e) was seen in at least 10 (12%) of 85 families with two or more affected siblings. We conclude that a substantial proportion of early familial coronary artery disease is probably related to production of high concentrations of H(e) by one or more major genes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)552-561
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume40
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Siblings
Coronary Artery Disease
Plasmas
Uric Acid
Vitamins
LDL Cholesterol
Creatinine
Odds Ratio
Genes
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Wu, L. L., Wu, J., Hunt, S., James, B. C., Vincent, G. M., Williams, R. R., & Hopkins, P. N. (1994). Plasma homocyst(e)ine as a risk factor for early familial coronary artery disease. Clinical Chemistry, 40(4), 552-561.

Plasma homocyst(e)ine as a risk factor for early familial coronary artery disease. / Wu, Lily L.; Wu, James; Hunt, Steven; James, Brent C.; Vincent, G. Michael; Williams, Roger R.; Hopkins, Paul N.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 40, No. 4, 1994, p. 552-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, LL, Wu, J, Hunt, S, James, BC, Vincent, GM, Williams, RR & Hopkins, PN 1994, 'Plasma homocyst(e)ine as a risk factor for early familial coronary artery disease', Clinical Chemistry, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 552-561.
Wu LL, Wu J, Hunt S, James BC, Vincent GM, Williams RR et al. Plasma homocyst(e)ine as a risk factor for early familial coronary artery disease. Clinical Chemistry. 1994;40(4):552-561.
Wu, Lily L. ; Wu, James ; Hunt, Steven ; James, Brent C. ; Vincent, G. Michael ; Williams, Roger R. ; Hopkins, Paul N. / Plasma homocyst(e)ine as a risk factor for early familial coronary artery disease. In: Clinical Chemistry. 1994 ; Vol. 40, No. 4. pp. 552-561.
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