Persistent, antigen-specific, therapeutic antitumor immunity by dendritic cells genetically modified with an adenoviral vector to express a model tumor antigen

W. Song, Y. Tong, H. Carpenter, H. L. Kong, Ronald Crystal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play a critical role in the initiation of cellular immune responses. Using a BALB/c syngeneic colon carcinoma cell line expressing a model tumor antigen β-galactosidase (βgal), we previously reported (Song et al, J Exp Med 1997; 186: 1247-1256) that immunization of mice with a single injection of DCs genetically modified with an adenovirus vector expressing βgal confers potent protection against a lethal intravenous tumor challenge, as well as suppression of pre-established lung tumors, resulting in a significant survival advantage. In the present study, we have addressed the question: how long does the memory of tumor antigen-specific immunity persists after DC priming in vivo using this genetically modified DC-based cancer vaccination strategy? To accomplish this, two groups of mice were evaluated: (1) mice surviving >400 days following protection from an initial intravenous tumor challenge after immunization with DC genetically modified to express βgal; and (2) mice surviving >300 days that had previously demonstrated regression of pre-established lung tumors after treatment with DC immunization. By analyzing the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response and challenging these long-term survival mice with a second subcutaneous tumor administration, the data demonstrate that a single administration of DC genetically modified to express a model antigen induces long-lasting, antigen-specific antitumor immunity in both naive and tumor-bearing hosts, observations that have important implications in the development of genetically modified DC-based anti-tumor vaccination strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2080-2086
Number of pages7
JournalGene Therapy
Volume7
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasm Antigens
Dendritic Cells
Immunity
Antigens
Galactosidases
Neoplasms
Immunization
Therapeutics
Vaccination
Lung
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Adenoviridae
Cellular Immunity
Colon
Carcinoma
Cell Line
Injections

Keywords

  • Adenovirus
  • Dendritic cells
  • Gene therapy
  • T cell memory
  • Tumor immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Persistent, antigen-specific, therapeutic antitumor immunity by dendritic cells genetically modified with an adenoviral vector to express a model tumor antigen. / Song, W.; Tong, Y.; Carpenter, H.; Kong, H. L.; Crystal, Ronald.

In: Gene Therapy, Vol. 7, No. 24, 01.12.2000, p. 2080-2086.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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