Oxidation of selected lipids in low density lipoprotein: Effects on calcium transients in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes

Kan Zhi Liu, Hamid Massaeli, Bram Ramjiawan, Grant N. Pierce

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

When LDL is oxidized by a free radical generating system, both cholesterol and fatty acyl moieties within the LDL are modified. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can induce alterations in the Ca2+ transients in isolated cardiomyocytes. It is unclear if oxidation of the LDL fatty acyl chains (in phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesteryl esters) or oxidation of the LDL unesterified cholesterol is more important in producing the oxLDL-induced alteration in cellular calcium transients. Therefore, we investigated the possible role of oxidized cholesterol and fatty acyl chain peroxidation in the effects of LDL on Ca2+ transients. Cholesterol oxidase (CO) treatment of LDL produced oxidized cholesterol plus H2O2. The H2O2 peroxidized the LDL fatty acyl chains, as indicated by an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content. The cell systolic [Ca 2+] was significantly increased after incubation with CO-treated LDL. Diastolic [Ca2+] was unchanged. MDA content in the CO-treated LDL correlated with the change in systolic [Ca2+] of treated cells. Catalase, a scavenger of H2O2, inhibited MDA formation in the CO-treated LDL and prevented the increment in systolic [Ca2+] in the treated cells. A similar stimulatory effect on the Ca2+ transient was observed if cells were treated with LDL after exposure to only H 2O2 and not CO. Direct exposure of myocytes to H 2O2 (without LDL) failed to produce a stimulatory effect on the calcium transient but caused an increment in cellular diastolic Ca 2+. Exposure of myocytes to CO alone (without LDL) produced a significant increment in diastolic [Ca2+] and this effect was not prevented by catalase. These results suggest that fatty acid peroxidation in the LDL moiety is more important than oxidized cholesterol in the generation of ox-LDL-induced increases in Ca2+ transients in isolated cardiomyocytes. Further, oxidation of in situ cell membrane cholesterol will destroy cell integrity. Our data also underline the importance of adding extracellular lipid in any study of the effects of oxygen free radicals on cellular function. Under conditions of radiologic or chemically-induced generation of oxygen-derived free radicals, cardiac dysfunction and damage may be induced by this process.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvanced Bioactive Compounds Countering the Effects of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Agents
Subtitle of host publicationStrategies to Counter Biological Damage
Pages83-99
Number of pages17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameNATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology
ISSN (Print)1874-6489

Fingerprint

Lipoproteins
Cholesterol
LDL Lipoproteins
Cardiac Myocytes
Lipids
Calcium
Rabbits
Cholesterol Oxidase
Oxidation
Free radicals
Malondialdehyde
Free Radicals
oxidized low density lipoprotein
Catalase
Muscle Cells
Cells
Oxygen
Phospholipids
Cell membranes
Cholesterol Esters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Liu, K. Z., Massaeli, H., Ramjiawan, B., & Pierce, G. N. (2013). Oxidation of selected lipids in low density lipoprotein: Effects on calcium transients in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. In Advanced Bioactive Compounds Countering the Effects of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Agents: Strategies to Counter Biological Damage (pp. 83-99). (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6513-9_7

Oxidation of selected lipids in low density lipoprotein : Effects on calcium transients in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. / Liu, Kan Zhi; Massaeli, Hamid; Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N.

Advanced Bioactive Compounds Countering the Effects of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Agents: Strategies to Counter Biological Damage. 2013. p. 83-99 (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Liu, KZ, Massaeli, H, Ramjiawan, B & Pierce, GN 2013, Oxidation of selected lipids in low density lipoprotein: Effects on calcium transients in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. in Advanced Bioactive Compounds Countering the Effects of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Agents: Strategies to Counter Biological Damage. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology, pp. 83-99. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6513-9_7
Liu KZ, Massaeli H, Ramjiawan B, Pierce GN. Oxidation of selected lipids in low density lipoprotein: Effects on calcium transients in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. In Advanced Bioactive Compounds Countering the Effects of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Agents: Strategies to Counter Biological Damage. 2013. p. 83-99. (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6513-9_7
Liu, Kan Zhi ; Massaeli, Hamid ; Ramjiawan, Bram ; Pierce, Grant N. / Oxidation of selected lipids in low density lipoprotein : Effects on calcium transients in isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. Advanced Bioactive Compounds Countering the Effects of Radiological, Chemical and Biological Agents: Strategies to Counter Biological Damage. 2013. pp. 83-99 (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology).
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