On the resilience of the dependability framework to the intrusion of new security threats

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

B. Randell has been instrumental, with others, in the definition of the dependability framework. Initially thought of with a strong emphasis on accidental faults, it has paid more attention over the years to intentional ones and, thus, to classical security concepts as well. Recently, a couple of incidents have received a lot of attention: the Hydraq and Stuxnet worms outbreaks. They have been used to highlight what is being presented as a new and growing security concern, namely the so-called advanced persistent threats (a.k.a. apts). In this paper, we analyse how resilient the historical dependability framework can be with respect to these sudden changes in the threats landscape. We do this by offering a very brief summary of the concepts of interest for this discussion. Then we look into the Hydraq and Stuxnet incidents to identify their novel characteristics. We use these recent cases to figure out if the existing taxonomy is adequate to reason about these new threats. We eventually conclude this chapter by proposing some future avenues for research in that space.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages238-250
Number of pages13
Volume6875 LNCS
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventConference on Dependable and Historic Computing: The Randell Tales - Newcastle upon Tyne
Duration: 7 Apr 20118 Apr 2011

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6875 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

OtherConference on Dependable and Historic Computing: The Randell Tales
CityNewcastle upon Tyne
Period7/4/118/4/11

Fingerprint

Dependability
Resilience
Taxonomies
Worm
Taxonomy
Figure
Fault
Framework
Concepts

Keywords

  • advanced persistent threat
  • attack
  • dependability
  • fault tolerance
  • intrusion detection
  • resilience
  • security
  • vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Dacier, M. (2011). On the resilience of the dependability framework to the intrusion of new security threats. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 6875 LNCS, pp. 238-250). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6875 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-24541-1_17

On the resilience of the dependability framework to the intrusion of new security threats. / Dacier, Marc.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6875 LNCS 2011. p. 238-250 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6875 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dacier, M 2011, On the resilience of the dependability framework to the intrusion of new security threats. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 6875 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 6875 LNCS, pp. 238-250, Conference on Dependable and Historic Computing: The Randell Tales, Newcastle upon Tyne, 7/4/11. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-24541-1_17
Dacier M. On the resilience of the dependability framework to the intrusion of new security threats. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6875 LNCS. 2011. p. 238-250. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-24541-1_17
Dacier, Marc. / On the resilience of the dependability framework to the intrusion of new security threats. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6875 LNCS 2011. pp. 238-250 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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