Native and minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein depress smooth muscle matrix metalloproteinase levels

David Wilson, Hamid Massaeli, Grant N. Pierce, Peter Zahradka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vascular lesion development is associated with an accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins with in the vessel wall. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade these proteins. Conversely, oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) is implicated in atherogenesis through, amongst other cellular effects, a stimulation of the deposition of collagen within the vascular lesion. The present study investigated the potential for an interaction between oxidized LDL and MMP levels. Within the vessel wall fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial and infiltrating cells have been reported to secrete MMPs into the extracellular space to effect remodeling of the extracellular matrix. A consequence of angioplasty and atherosclerotic disease is the loss of endothelial cells or endothelial function, respectively. We have investigated the effects of chronic incubation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells from rabbit thoracic aorta with oxidized LDL and its influence on MMP levels in the extracellular space. Our data indicate that a low concentration of minimally oxidized LDL (0.005 mg/mL) significantly depressed the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 present in the culture medium. Native LDL exerted the same effect but exhibited reduced potency. The effects were not attributable to cytotoxicity exerted by the oxidized LDL. The reduction in MMP secretion into the extracellular medium was a result of decreased enzyme synthesis within the smooth muscle cell. Our results demonstrate that an important atherogenic moiety, oxidized LDL, can reduce MMP activity and hence has the potential to increase the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins within SMC-rich vascular lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-149
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Volume249
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Matrix Metalloproteinases
Smooth Muscle
Muscle
Blood Vessels
Extracellular Matrix Proteins
Extracellular Space
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Endothelial Cells
Cells
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
Endothelial cells
Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
Fibroblasts
Cytotoxicity
Thoracic Aorta
Vascular Smooth Muscle
LDL Lipoproteins
Angioplasty
Extracellular Matrix
Culture Media

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cellular
  • Experimental
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Lipoproteins
  • Matrix metalloproteinases
  • Oxidized low density lipoprotein
  • Rabbit
  • Smooth muscle
  • Vasculature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Native and minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein depress smooth muscle matrix metalloproteinase levels. / Wilson, David; Massaeli, Hamid; Pierce, Grant N.; Zahradka, Peter.

In: Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Vol. 249, No. 1-2, 01.07.2003, p. 141-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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