Nation, narration and Islam

Memory and governmentality in Germany

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article analyses narrations of German memories in relation to the incorporation of Islam into Germany. Memory narratives are not approached from the angle of identity, but as part of the continuous business of rationalizing politics inside and beyond the state. The citational use of narratives authorizes interventions in the process of government by constituting its objects, determining the means and aims of government and defining its authority. Narratives are a governmental practice, i.e. they connect politics narrowly defined with individual conduct, since narratives allow determination of a social context and what constitutes adequate behaviour within it. In this way, they help to orient practices of freedom. Acts such as the cultivating of an ethics of interreligious competition, involvement in specific forms of dialogue, or activism against Islamophobia and anti-Semitism derive meaning in part through such narratives, while simultaneously contributing new meaning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-352
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent Sociology
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

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governmentality
narration
Islam
narrative
antisemitism
politics
dialogue
moral philosophy
act

Keywords

  • Governmentality
  • Holocaust
  • Islam
  • Islamophobia
  • memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Nation, narration and Islam : Memory and governmentality in Germany. / Peter, Frank.

In: Current Sociology, Vol. 60, No. 3, 05.2012, p. 338-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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