Moondust lunar dust simulation and mitigation

Roman V. Kruzelecky, Brian Wong, Brahim Aissa, Emile Haddad, Wes Jamroz, Edward Cloutis, Iosif Daniel Rosca, Suong V. Hoa, Daniel Therriault, Alex Ellery

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The feasibility of extended exploration and human presence on the Moon and Mars depends critically on dealing with various environmental factors, and especially on the effects of dust. One of the most restricting facets of lunar surface exploration, as experienced by the prior Apollo landed missions, is the fine lunar dust, its high adherence, and its restrictive friction-like action. Moreover, the lunar dust particle size distribution extends generally into the submicron range, where it could potentially have toxic effects on exposed astronauts through their respiratory system. MoonDust is a project being performed in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency to study the effects of lunar dust on optics and mechanical elements, and to develop innovative nano-filtration solutions to extend their operational lifetime within a lunar and/or Mars environment. To assist this work, a small lunar environment simulation vacuum chamber is being developed at MPBC, to enable the study of lunar dust effects on optics elements and rotary mechanisms, at pressures brought down below 10-5 Torr. The developed simulator includes an injection system for lunar dust simulants, an excimer UV laser-light source for vacuum UV (VUV), and various diagnostic ports for relevant optical and electrical measurements. The MoonDust innovative dust mitigation solution exploits key characteristics of the lunar dust while incorporating nano-filtration technologies based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) materials. The aim is to minimize the required consumables while providing high capacity and high efficiencies for the more dangerous submicron particles. This paper reports on the development of the lunar environmental chamber and the associated lunar dust simulator. Some of the preliminary trial experimental results for filters based on CNTs for optical devices and rotary mechanical joint protection are also presented.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc.
ISBN (Print)9781600869570
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010
Event40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 11 Jul 201015 Jul 2010

Publication series

Name40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010

Conference

Conference40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period11/7/1015/7/10

Fingerprint

Dust
mitigation
dust
simulation
Nanofiltration
simulator
Mars
Optics
Simulators
Vacuum
Environmental chambers
Respiratory system
Carbon Nanotubes
Poisons
Moon
Optical devices
Particle size analysis
Light sources
Carbon nanotubes
environmental factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Kruzelecky, R. V., Wong, B., Aissa, B., Haddad, E., Jamroz, W., Cloutis, E., ... Ellery, A. (2010). Moondust lunar dust simulation and mitigation. In 40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010 (40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc..

Moondust lunar dust simulation and mitigation. / Kruzelecky, Roman V.; Wong, Brian; Aissa, Brahim; Haddad, Emile; Jamroz, Wes; Cloutis, Edward; Daniel Rosca, Iosif; Hoa, Suong V.; Therriault, Daniel; Ellery, Alex.

40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., 2010. (40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kruzelecky, RV, Wong, B, Aissa, B, Haddad, E, Jamroz, W, Cloutis, E, Daniel Rosca, I, Hoa, SV, Therriault, D & Ellery, A 2010, Moondust lunar dust simulation and mitigation. in 40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010. 40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., 40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010, Barcelona, Spain, 11/7/10.
Kruzelecky RV, Wong B, Aissa B, Haddad E, Jamroz W, Cloutis E et al. Moondust lunar dust simulation and mitigation. In 40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. 2010. (40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010).
Kruzelecky, Roman V. ; Wong, Brian ; Aissa, Brahim ; Haddad, Emile ; Jamroz, Wes ; Cloutis, Edward ; Daniel Rosca, Iosif ; Hoa, Suong V. ; Therriault, Daniel ; Ellery, Alex. / Moondust lunar dust simulation and mitigation. 40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc., 2010. (40th International Conference on Environmental Systems, ICES 2010).
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