Molecular surveillance of chloroquine drug resistance markers (Pfcrt and Pfmdr1) among imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Qatar

Anushree Acharya, Devendra Bansal, Praveen K. Bharti, Fahmi Y. Khan, Salem Abusalah, Ashraf Elmalik, Mohammed ElKhalifa, Pradyumna K. Mohapatra, Jagadish Mahanta, Rakesh Sehgal, Neeru Singh, Ali A. Sultan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Imported malaria has been a great challenge for public health in Qatar due to influx of large number of migrant workers. Antimalarial drug resistance has emerged as one of the greatest challenges facing malaria control today. Monitoring parasite haplotypes that predict susceptibility to major antimalarial can guide treatment policies. This study aimed to determine molecular drug resistance pattern in imported malaria cases in Qatar. Blood samples from the uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria patients were collected at Hamad General Hospital, HMC, Doha, Qatar. The samples were further confirmed by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for P. falciparum. Molecular markers of chloroquine (Pfcrt and Pfmdr1) were analyzed by using nested PCR- RFLP method to determine the key point mutations associated with chloroquine (CQ) drug resistance. A total 118 blood samples were positive for P. falciparum. Overall, by RFLP, 72% harboured wild type allele (N86) of Pfmdr1 gene. The prevalence of Pfcrt mutant (T76), WT (K76) and mixed alleles (K76T) was 63.6% (n = 75), 22.9% (n = 27) and 13.5% (n = 16), respectively. Mean parasitaemia level was higher among the wild type alleles of Pfcrt gene as compared to the mixed/mutant alleles whereas mixed alleles of Pfmdr1 gene having high parasitaemia. Molecular surveillance strategy based on imported malaria cases can be used to detect and track CQ drug-resistant malaria. The data presented here might be helpful for enrichment of molecular surveillance of antimalarial resistance and will be useful for developing and updating antimalarial guidance for non-immune imported cases in Qatar.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalPathogens and Global Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Qatar
Falciparum Malaria
Chloroquine
Drug Resistance
Malaria
Antimalarials
Alleles
Parasitemia
Plasmodium falciparum
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Genes
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Point Mutation
General Hospitals
Haplotypes
Parasites
Public Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • chloroquine
  • imported malaria
  • molecular drug resistance
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Qatar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Molecular surveillance of chloroquine drug resistance markers (Pfcrt and Pfmdr1) among imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Qatar. / Acharya, Anushree; Bansal, Devendra; Bharti, Praveen K.; Khan, Fahmi Y.; Abusalah, Salem; Elmalik, Ashraf; ElKhalifa, Mohammed; Mohapatra, Pradyumna K.; Mahanta, Jagadish; Sehgal, Rakesh; Singh, Neeru; Sultan, Ali A.

In: Pathogens and Global Health, 10.11.2017, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Acharya, Anushree ; Bansal, Devendra ; Bharti, Praveen K. ; Khan, Fahmi Y. ; Abusalah, Salem ; Elmalik, Ashraf ; ElKhalifa, Mohammed ; Mohapatra, Pradyumna K. ; Mahanta, Jagadish ; Sehgal, Rakesh ; Singh, Neeru ; Sultan, Ali A. / Molecular surveillance of chloroquine drug resistance markers (Pfcrt and Pfmdr1) among imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Qatar. In: Pathogens and Global Health. 2017 ; pp. 1-6.
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