Microarray image addressing based on the radon transform

G. Antoniol, Michele Ceccarelli, A. Petrosino

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A fundamental step of Microarray image analysis is the detection of the grid structure for the accurate localization of each spot, representing the state of a given gene in a particular experimental condition. This step is known as gridding or microarray addressing. Most of the available microarray gridding approaches require human intervention; for example, to specify landmarks, some points in the spot grid, or even to precisely locate individual spots. Automating this part of the process can allow high throughput analysis [11]. This paper is aimed towards at the development fully automated procedures for the problem of automatic microarray gridding. Indeed, many of the automatic gridding approaches are based on two phases, the first aimed at the generation of an hypothesis consisting into a regular interpolating grid, whereas the second performs an adaptation of the hypothesis. Here we show that the first step can efficiently be accomplished by using the the Radon Transform, whereas the second step could be modeled by an iterative posterior maximization procedure [2].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - International Conference on Image Processing, ICIP
Pages13-16
Number of pages4
Volume1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventIEEE International Conference on Image Processing 2005, ICIP 2005 - Genova, Italy
Duration: 11 Sep 200514 Sep 2005

Other

OtherIEEE International Conference on Image Processing 2005, ICIP 2005
CountryItaly
CityGenova
Period11/9/0514/9/05

Fingerprint

Radon
Microarrays
Image analysis
Genes
Throughput
Mathematical transformations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Antoniol, G., Ceccarelli, M., & Petrosino, A. (2005). Microarray image addressing based on the radon transform. In Proceedings - International Conference on Image Processing, ICIP (Vol. 1, pp. 13-16). [1529675] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIP.2005.1529675

Microarray image addressing based on the radon transform. / Antoniol, G.; Ceccarelli, Michele; Petrosino, A.

Proceedings - International Conference on Image Processing, ICIP. Vol. 1 2005. p. 13-16 1529675.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Antoniol, G, Ceccarelli, M & Petrosino, A 2005, Microarray image addressing based on the radon transform. in Proceedings - International Conference on Image Processing, ICIP. vol. 1, 1529675, pp. 13-16, IEEE International Conference on Image Processing 2005, ICIP 2005, Genova, Italy, 11/9/05. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIP.2005.1529675
Antoniol G, Ceccarelli M, Petrosino A. Microarray image addressing based on the radon transform. In Proceedings - International Conference on Image Processing, ICIP. Vol. 1. 2005. p. 13-16. 1529675 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIP.2005.1529675
Antoniol, G. ; Ceccarelli, Michele ; Petrosino, A. / Microarray image addressing based on the radon transform. Proceedings - International Conference on Image Processing, ICIP. Vol. 1 2005. pp. 13-16
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