Metabolic signatures differentiate ovarian from colon cancer cell lines

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In this era of precision medicine, the deep and comprehensive characterization of tumor phenotypes will lead to therapeutic strategies beyond classical factors such as primary sites or anatomical staging. Recently, "-omics" approached have enlightened our knowledge of tumor biology. Such approaches have been extensively implemented in order to provide biomarkers for monitoring of the disease as well as to improve readouts of therapeutic impact. The application of metabolomics to the study of cancer is especially beneficial, since it reflects the biochemical consequences of many cancer type-specific pathophysiological processes. Here, we characterize metabolic profiles of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines to provide broader insight into differentiating metabolic processes for prospective drug development and clinical screening. Methods: We applied non-targeted metabolomics-based mass spectroscopy combined with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography for the metabolic phenotyping of four cancer cell lines: two from colon cancer (HCT15, HCT116) and two from ovarian cancer (OVCAR3, SKOV3). We used the MetaP server for statistical data analysis. Results: A total of 225 metabolites were detected in all four cell lines; 67 of these molecules significantly discriminated colon cancer from ovarian cancer cells. Metabolic signatures revealed in our study suggest elevated tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid metabolism in ovarian cancer cell lines, as well as increased β-oxidation and urea cycle metabolism in colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our study provides a panel of distinct metabolic fingerprints between colon and ovarian cancer cell lines. These may serve as potential drug targets, and now can be evaluated further in primary cells, biofluids, and tissue samples for biomarker purposes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number223
JournalJournal of Translational Medicine
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jul 2015

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Ovarian Neoplasms
Colonic Neoplasms
Cells
Cell Line
Metabolomics
Neoplasms
Biomarkers
Tumors
Precision Medicine
Statistical Data Interpretation
Citric Acid Cycle
Metabolome
Dermatoglyphics
Lipid Metabolism
Liquid Chromatography
Liquid chromatography
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Gas Chromatography
Metabolites
Urea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

@article{0c1750d8368c49fd8389c18241c56aea,
title = "Metabolic signatures differentiate ovarian from colon cancer cell lines",
abstract = "Background: In this era of precision medicine, the deep and comprehensive characterization of tumor phenotypes will lead to therapeutic strategies beyond classical factors such as primary sites or anatomical staging. Recently, {"}-omics{"} approached have enlightened our knowledge of tumor biology. Such approaches have been extensively implemented in order to provide biomarkers for monitoring of the disease as well as to improve readouts of therapeutic impact. The application of metabolomics to the study of cancer is especially beneficial, since it reflects the biochemical consequences of many cancer type-specific pathophysiological processes. Here, we characterize metabolic profiles of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines to provide broader insight into differentiating metabolic processes for prospective drug development and clinical screening. Methods: We applied non-targeted metabolomics-based mass spectroscopy combined with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography for the metabolic phenotyping of four cancer cell lines: two from colon cancer (HCT15, HCT116) and two from ovarian cancer (OVCAR3, SKOV3). We used the MetaP server for statistical data analysis. Results: A total of 225 metabolites were detected in all four cell lines; 67 of these molecules significantly discriminated colon cancer from ovarian cancer cells. Metabolic signatures revealed in our study suggest elevated tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid metabolism in ovarian cancer cell lines, as well as increased β-oxidation and urea cycle metabolism in colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our study provides a panel of distinct metabolic fingerprints between colon and ovarian cancer cell lines. These may serve as potential drug targets, and now can be evaluated further in primary cells, biofluids, and tissue samples for biomarker purposes.",
author = "Anna Halama and Guerrouahen, {Bella S.} and Jennifer Pasquier and Ilhem Diboun and Karoly, {Edward D.} and Karsten Suhre and Tabrizi, {Arash Rafii}",
year = "2015",
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T1 - Metabolic signatures differentiate ovarian from colon cancer cell lines

AU - Halama, Anna

AU - Guerrouahen, Bella S.

AU - Pasquier, Jennifer

AU - Diboun, Ilhem

AU - Karoly, Edward D.

AU - Suhre, Karsten

AU - Tabrizi, Arash Rafii

PY - 2015/7/14

Y1 - 2015/7/14

N2 - Background: In this era of precision medicine, the deep and comprehensive characterization of tumor phenotypes will lead to therapeutic strategies beyond classical factors such as primary sites or anatomical staging. Recently, "-omics" approached have enlightened our knowledge of tumor biology. Such approaches have been extensively implemented in order to provide biomarkers for monitoring of the disease as well as to improve readouts of therapeutic impact. The application of metabolomics to the study of cancer is especially beneficial, since it reflects the biochemical consequences of many cancer type-specific pathophysiological processes. Here, we characterize metabolic profiles of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines to provide broader insight into differentiating metabolic processes for prospective drug development and clinical screening. Methods: We applied non-targeted metabolomics-based mass spectroscopy combined with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography for the metabolic phenotyping of four cancer cell lines: two from colon cancer (HCT15, HCT116) and two from ovarian cancer (OVCAR3, SKOV3). We used the MetaP server for statistical data analysis. Results: A total of 225 metabolites were detected in all four cell lines; 67 of these molecules significantly discriminated colon cancer from ovarian cancer cells. Metabolic signatures revealed in our study suggest elevated tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid metabolism in ovarian cancer cell lines, as well as increased β-oxidation and urea cycle metabolism in colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our study provides a panel of distinct metabolic fingerprints between colon and ovarian cancer cell lines. These may serve as potential drug targets, and now can be evaluated further in primary cells, biofluids, and tissue samples for biomarker purposes.

AB - Background: In this era of precision medicine, the deep and comprehensive characterization of tumor phenotypes will lead to therapeutic strategies beyond classical factors such as primary sites or anatomical staging. Recently, "-omics" approached have enlightened our knowledge of tumor biology. Such approaches have been extensively implemented in order to provide biomarkers for monitoring of the disease as well as to improve readouts of therapeutic impact. The application of metabolomics to the study of cancer is especially beneficial, since it reflects the biochemical consequences of many cancer type-specific pathophysiological processes. Here, we characterize metabolic profiles of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines to provide broader insight into differentiating metabolic processes for prospective drug development and clinical screening. Methods: We applied non-targeted metabolomics-based mass spectroscopy combined with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography for the metabolic phenotyping of four cancer cell lines: two from colon cancer (HCT15, HCT116) and two from ovarian cancer (OVCAR3, SKOV3). We used the MetaP server for statistical data analysis. Results: A total of 225 metabolites were detected in all four cell lines; 67 of these molecules significantly discriminated colon cancer from ovarian cancer cells. Metabolic signatures revealed in our study suggest elevated tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid metabolism in ovarian cancer cell lines, as well as increased β-oxidation and urea cycle metabolism in colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our study provides a panel of distinct metabolic fingerprints between colon and ovarian cancer cell lines. These may serve as potential drug targets, and now can be evaluated further in primary cells, biofluids, and tissue samples for biomarker purposes.

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