Mechanical processing of high Jc BSCCO superconductors

R. J. Asaro, Said Ahzi, W. Blumenthal, A. Digiovanni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High Jc superconducting oxides can be obtained by processing polycrystalline powders to achieve high ce:degrees of densification and sharp crystallographic textures characterized by the conducting crystallographic planes lying parallel to the direction of the current flow (i.e., in the plane of a conducting tape or parallel to the axis of a wire). In the present study, we investigate the densification and texture evolution in a Pb doped Bi—Sr—Ca—Cu oxide (BSCCO) under axisymmetric and plane strain (channel die) compression. Experimental measurements of the microstructural evolution, including crystallographic texture and grain morphology, are presented as a function of the degree of deformation and densification. The orientations of the conducting planes (c planes) are shown by measured X-ray pole figures and analyses of these orientations are given for both tests. A model based on crystal plasticity theory is proposed to simulate the inelastic deformation and texturing of the BSCCO oxide. Predicted textures, under both axisymmetric and plane strain compression, agree well with the experimental observations. Analysis of the predicted orientation distribution of the cplanes with respect to the loading direction suggests that the most desirable texture for a high overall critical current density can be obtained by axisymmetric compression, but textures that should lead to high Jc's are also obtained through plane strain compression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-538
Number of pages22
JournalPhilosophical Magazine A: Physics of Condensed Matter, Structure, Defects and Mechanical Properties
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxide superconductors
textures
Textures
Oxides
oxides
plane strain
densification
Processing
Densification
conduction
Texturing
Microstructural evolution
plastic properties
Powders
Tapes
tapes
Plasticity
Poles
critical current
poles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Mechanical processing of high Jc BSCCO superconductors. / Asaro, R. J.; Ahzi, Said; Blumenthal, W.; Digiovanni, A.

In: Philosophical Magazine A: Physics of Condensed Matter, Structure, Defects and Mechanical Properties, Vol. 66, No. 4, 1992, p. 517-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9e8012bb42104ee8b373319aab83b23d,
title = "Mechanical processing of high Jc BSCCO superconductors",
abstract = "High Jc superconducting oxides can be obtained by processing polycrystalline powders to achieve high ce:degrees of densification and sharp crystallographic textures characterized by the conducting crystallographic planes lying parallel to the direction of the current flow (i.e., in the plane of a conducting tape or parallel to the axis of a wire). In the present study, we investigate the densification and texture evolution in a Pb doped Bi—Sr—Ca—Cu oxide (BSCCO) under axisymmetric and plane strain (channel die) compression. Experimental measurements of the microstructural evolution, including crystallographic texture and grain morphology, are presented as a function of the degree of deformation and densification. The orientations of the conducting planes (c planes) are shown by measured X-ray pole figures and analyses of these orientations are given for both tests. A model based on crystal plasticity theory is proposed to simulate the inelastic deformation and texturing of the BSCCO oxide. Predicted textures, under both axisymmetric and plane strain compression, agree well with the experimental observations. Analysis of the predicted orientation distribution of the cplanes with respect to the loading direction suggests that the most desirable texture for a high overall critical current density can be obtained by axisymmetric compression, but textures that should lead to high Jc's are also obtained through plane strain compression.",
author = "Asaro, {R. J.} and Said Ahzi and W. Blumenthal and A. Digiovanni",
year = "1992",
doi = "10.1080/01418619208201573",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "517--538",
journal = "Philosophical Magazine A: Physics of Condensed Matter, Structure, Defects and Mechanical Properties",
issn = "0141-8610",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical processing of high Jc BSCCO superconductors

AU - Asaro, R. J.

AU - Ahzi, Said

AU - Blumenthal, W.

AU - Digiovanni, A.

PY - 1992

Y1 - 1992

N2 - High Jc superconducting oxides can be obtained by processing polycrystalline powders to achieve high ce:degrees of densification and sharp crystallographic textures characterized by the conducting crystallographic planes lying parallel to the direction of the current flow (i.e., in the plane of a conducting tape or parallel to the axis of a wire). In the present study, we investigate the densification and texture evolution in a Pb doped Bi—Sr—Ca—Cu oxide (BSCCO) under axisymmetric and plane strain (channel die) compression. Experimental measurements of the microstructural evolution, including crystallographic texture and grain morphology, are presented as a function of the degree of deformation and densification. The orientations of the conducting planes (c planes) are shown by measured X-ray pole figures and analyses of these orientations are given for both tests. A model based on crystal plasticity theory is proposed to simulate the inelastic deformation and texturing of the BSCCO oxide. Predicted textures, under both axisymmetric and plane strain compression, agree well with the experimental observations. Analysis of the predicted orientation distribution of the cplanes with respect to the loading direction suggests that the most desirable texture for a high overall critical current density can be obtained by axisymmetric compression, but textures that should lead to high Jc's are also obtained through plane strain compression.

AB - High Jc superconducting oxides can be obtained by processing polycrystalline powders to achieve high ce:degrees of densification and sharp crystallographic textures characterized by the conducting crystallographic planes lying parallel to the direction of the current flow (i.e., in the plane of a conducting tape or parallel to the axis of a wire). In the present study, we investigate the densification and texture evolution in a Pb doped Bi—Sr—Ca—Cu oxide (BSCCO) under axisymmetric and plane strain (channel die) compression. Experimental measurements of the microstructural evolution, including crystallographic texture and grain morphology, are presented as a function of the degree of deformation and densification. The orientations of the conducting planes (c planes) are shown by measured X-ray pole figures and analyses of these orientations are given for both tests. A model based on crystal plasticity theory is proposed to simulate the inelastic deformation and texturing of the BSCCO oxide. Predicted textures, under both axisymmetric and plane strain compression, agree well with the experimental observations. Analysis of the predicted orientation distribution of the cplanes with respect to the loading direction suggests that the most desirable texture for a high overall critical current density can be obtained by axisymmetric compression, but textures that should lead to high Jc's are also obtained through plane strain compression.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0000300275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0000300275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01418619208201573

DO - 10.1080/01418619208201573

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0000300275

VL - 66

SP - 517

EP - 538

JO - Philosophical Magazine A: Physics of Condensed Matter, Structure, Defects and Mechanical Properties

JF - Philosophical Magazine A: Physics of Condensed Matter, Structure, Defects and Mechanical Properties

SN - 0141-8610

IS - 4

ER -