Magnetic resonance imaging of glutamate

Kejia Cai, Mohammad Haris, Anup Singh, Feliks Kogan, Joel H. Greenberg, Hari Hariharan, John A. Detre, Ravinder Reddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

279 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glutamate, a major neurotransmitter in the brain, shows a pH-and concentration-dependent chemical exchange saturation transfer effect (GluCEST) between its amine group and bulk water, with potential for in vivo imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance. GluCEST asymmetry is observed ∼3 p.p.m. downfield from bulk water. Middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat brain resulted in an ∼100% elevation of GluCEST in the ipsilateral side compared with the contralateral side, predominantly owing to pH changes. In a rat brain tumor model with blood-brain barrier disruption, intravenous glutamate injection resulted in a clear elevation of GluCEST and a similar increase in the proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal of glutamate. GluCEST maps from healthy human brain were also obtained. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using GluCEST for mapping relative changes in glutamate concentration, as well as pH, in vivo. Contributions from other brain metabolites to the GluCEST effect are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)302-306
Number of pages5
JournalNature Medicine
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Magnetic resonance imaging
Glutamic Acid
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Rats
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Water
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Blood-Brain Barrier
Brain Neoplasms
Intravenous Injections
Amines
Neurotransmitter Agents
Metabolites
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Tumors
Imaging techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cai, K., Haris, M., Singh, A., Kogan, F., Greenberg, J. H., Hariharan, H., ... Reddy, R. (2012). Magnetic resonance imaging of glutamate. Nature Medicine, 18(2), 302-306. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2615

Magnetic resonance imaging of glutamate. / Cai, Kejia; Haris, Mohammad; Singh, Anup; Kogan, Feliks; Greenberg, Joel H.; Hariharan, Hari; Detre, John A.; Reddy, Ravinder.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 2, 02.2012, p. 302-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cai, K, Haris, M, Singh, A, Kogan, F, Greenberg, JH, Hariharan, H, Detre, JA & Reddy, R 2012, 'Magnetic resonance imaging of glutamate', Nature Medicine, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 302-306. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2615
Cai K, Haris M, Singh A, Kogan F, Greenberg JH, Hariharan H et al. Magnetic resonance imaging of glutamate. Nature Medicine. 2012 Feb;18(2):302-306. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2615
Cai, Kejia ; Haris, Mohammad ; Singh, Anup ; Kogan, Feliks ; Greenberg, Joel H. ; Hariharan, Hari ; Detre, John A. ; Reddy, Ravinder. / Magnetic resonance imaging of glutamate. In: Nature Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 302-306.
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