Law, religion, and secular order

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article compares the law and religion jurisprudence of the us Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights across three legal areas: religious symbols and religion-state relations, individual religious freedom, and institutional religious freedom or freedom of the church. Particular focus is given to the manner in which this jurisprudence reveals the underlying structure and meaning of the secular. Although there continues to be significant jurisprudential diversity between these two courts and across these legal areas, there is also emerging a shared accounting of religion, secularity, and moral order in the late modern West.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-127
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Law, Religion and State
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

religious freedom
Religion
jurisprudence
Law
Supreme Court
symbol
human rights
church
Jurisprudence
Religious Freedom
European Court of Human Rights
Moral Order
Religious Symbols
Secularity

Keywords

  • European Court of Human Rights
  • Religious autonomy
  • Religious freedom
  • Religious symbols
  • Secular
  • United States Supreme Court

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Law, religion, and secular order. / Calo, Zachary.

In: Journal of Law, Religion and State, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 104-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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